Advanced Functional Materials

Advanced Functional Materials is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal, established in February 2001, is published by Wiley-VCH. However, it has been published under other titles since 1985. Coverage of this journal encompasses all topics pertaining to materials science. Topical coverage includes photovoltaics, organic electronics, carbon materials, nanotechnology, liquid crystals, magnetic materials, surfaces and interfaces, and biomaterials. Topics in physics and chemistry. Publishing formats include original research papers, feature articles and highlights. It was established in 2001 by Peter Gregory, the Editor of Advanced Materials, when the Wiley journal Advanced Materials for Optics and Electronics was discontinued. Advanced Functional Materials is the sister journal to Advanced Materials and publishes full papers and feature articles on the development and applications of functional materials, including topics in chemistry, physics, nanotechnology, ceramics, metallurgy, and biomaterials. Frequent topics covered by the journal also include liquid crystals, semiconductors, superconductors, optics, lasers, sensors, porous materials, light-emitting materials, magnetic

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons Wiley-VCH
Country
Germany
History
1985–present
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1616-3028
Impact factor
8.486 (2010)
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Energy & Green Tech

Chemists advance solar energy storage aimed at global challenges

Increasing demand for electrification in rural areas poses challenges, but also creates opportunities for development of decentralized electrification systems. Compared with conventional electrical grids based on large, centralized ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

Environment-friendly compound shows promise for solar cell use

A widespread transition to solar energy will depend heavily on reliable, safe, and affordable technology like batteries for energy storage and solar cells for energy conversion. At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, researchers ...

Robotics

Chameleon's tongue strike inspires fast-acting robots

Chameleons, salamanders and many toads use stored elastic energy to launch their sticky tongues at unsuspecting insects located up to one-and-a-half body lengths away, catching them within a tenth of a second.

page 1 from 3