Journal of the Royal Society Interface

Journal of the Royal Society Interface welcomes articles of high quality research at the interface of the physical and life sciences. It provides a high-quality forum to publish rapidly and interact across this boundary in two main ways: J. R. Soc. Interface publishes research applying chemistry, engineering, materials science, mathematics and physics to the biological and medical sciences; it also highlights discoveries in the life sciences of relevance to the physical sciences. Both sides of the interface are considered equally and it is one of the only journals to cover this exciting new territory. J. R. Soc. Interface welcomes contributions on a diverse range of topics, including but not limited to; biocomplexity, bioengineering, bioinformatics, biomaterials, biomechanics, bionanoscience, biophysics, chemical biology, computer science (as applied to the life sciences), medical physics, synthetic biology, systems biology, theoretical biology and tissue engineering.

Publisher
The Royal Society
Country
United Kingdom
History
2004-present
Website
http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org
Impact factor
4.260 (2010)
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Robotics

Can sea star movement inspire better robots?

Have you ever seen a sea star move? To many of us, sea star seem motionless, like a rock on the ocean's floor, but in actuality, they have hundreds of tube feet attached to their underbelly. These feet stretch and contract ...

Robotics

EuMoBot: Replicating euglenoid movement in a soft robot

Swimming is a form of locomotion employed by many organisms across a wide range of scales in nature. Microorganisms with small mass that encounter dominance of viscous forces in the medium require a change in shape that does ...

Robotics

Teaching robots to climb walls by mimicking the cockroach headbutt

A team of researchers from the University of California, Harvard University and The Pennsylvania State University has found a simple approach to getting a robot to change planes when running into a wall—follow the example ...

Engineering

Soft sensors for smart textiles

Researchers from Empa in St. Gallen have succeeded in producing optic fibers for sensors that are ideal for textiles. This would enable hospitals to monitor whether a patient is developing pressure sores, for instance.

Robotics

Robot mimics vertebrate motion

Based on X-ray videos, EPFL scientists have invented a new robot that mimics the way salamanders walk and swim with unprecedented detail: a tool for understanding the evolution of vertebrate locomotion.

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