Batteroo says $2.50 Batteriser sleeve gives battery extended life

Batteroo says Batteriser sleeve gives battery extended life

A battery-life extender has been announced, claiming up to 800 percent additional performance. The company believes it will have a significant impact on disposable energy market and the environment.

The company is Batteroo and the product is Batteriser. What is Batteriser? It's a sleeve that fits over new or most used batteries. It's stainless-steel at less than .1 millimeters thin. Batteriser is reusable. Writing about the Batteriser, Jon Phillips, editor in chief of PCWorld, said, "It's essentially a voltage booster that sucks every last drop of useable energy from ostensibly spent batteries."

Most devices only tap 20 percent of a 's energy before the device stops functioning, and then the batteries are thrown in the trash— that's a lot considering each year over 15 billion disposable batteries are consumed globally. The company release said that only approximately two percent of these batteries were disposed of properly. Those thrown away lead to "soil contamination and a laundry list of negative environmental impacts."

"When we get a new battery it is 1.5 volts, when we use it in a device it goes down to 1.3 volts under load condition, at that point we consider it to be dead and throw it away," said Dr. Kiumars Parvin, professor of physics at San Jose State University.

Once the product is on, it will tap into the energy that is usually thrown away. "Batteriser lets you tap into the remaining 80 percent of energy," said the company release, with the batteries lasting up to eight times longer.

At work, said the release, is an "intelligent voltage management and delivery mechanism. Batteroo introduces this system in the format of a sleeve that makes contact with the positive and negative ends of a common battery to access untapped remaining energy at a steady state system voltage."

Prof. Parvin said that in a lab test of the sleeve, "we confirmed that the Batteriser taps into the 80 percent of that is usually thrown away."

The product will be available for AA, AAA, C, and D-cell batteries. A four-pack of the sleeves will sell for under $10.

Phillips said that while voltage boosters are nothing new, Batteriser is noteworthy in that "it scales down the technology to the point where it can fit inside a stainless steel sleeve less than 0.1 mm thick." That makes it thin enough to fit inside a variety of battery compartments.

The news release said Batteriser in tests was proven compatible on a number of battery-operated home and office gadgets. The range included wireless keyboards, noise-cancelling headphones, Xbox and Wii controllers, TV remote controls, walkie-talkies, digital scales, electric toothbrushes, toys, radios, flashlights and blood-pressure monitors.

At the time of this writing, the Batteriser web site was not available; PCWorld said the product is to go on sale in September.


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More information:http://www.batteriser.com/

Press release

https://www.google.com/patents/US20120121943

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Jun 03, 2015
when we use it in a device it goes down to 1.3 volts under load condition, at that point we consider it to be dead and throw it away," said Dr. Kiumars Parvin.
Bollocks.
Most electronic designs take 0.9V to be the cut-off below which there is no more useful energy. Look at "single-cell operation" and any manufacturers power supply chips, like Maxim for instance.
There is a very early paper from Jim williams (Lineartech) that quotes 1.3V as the drop-off, but this is 1985 and applies to carbon-zinc batteries, and was biased by their parts only working to 1.2V .
Even poor designs work down to 1V, leaving <10% remaining energy in the battery.
Most if not all products work OK with NiMH rechargeables - whose starting voltage is only 1.3V open-load. Look up NiMH disharge curve.

JRi
Jun 03, 2015
Old batteries leak quite often, resulting in corrosion in the battery compartment. I wonder if this device leads to higher probability to battery leaks.

Jun 03, 2015
JRI

Perhaps that is why it's made of stainless steel.

Jun 03, 2015
'Joule Thief' ??

If so, well done on 'skinnifying' it.

Unfortunately, any leaking battery may bypass this gadget and devour the appliance...

Jun 03, 2015
sounds good to me

Jun 03, 2015
when we use it in a device it goes down to 1.3 volts under load condition, at that point we consider it to be dead and throw it away," said Dr. Kiumars Parvin.
Bollocks.
Most electronic designs take 0.9V to be the cut-off below which there is no more useful energy. Look at "single-cell operation" and any manufacturers power supply chips, like Maxim for instance.
There is a very early paper from Jim williams (Lineartech) that quotes 1.3V as the drop-off, but this is 1985 and applies to carbon-zinc batteries, and was biased by their parts only working to 1.2V .
Even poor designs work down to 1V, leaving <10% remaining energy in the battery.
Most if not all products work OK with NiMH rechargeables - whose starting voltage is only 1.3V open-load. Look up NiMH disharge curve.

So it's all a bunch of lies? Anybody else crying foul? Consumer Reports?

Roj
Jun 03, 2015
"At the time of this writing, the Batteriser web site was not available; PCWorld said the product is to go on sale in September."

By September China will have stolen the intellectual property from some disgruntled employee, and have full scale production in foreign markets.

Jun 03, 2015
It's likely a DC to DC converter; it wouldn't take much to get full output voltage that way. Nice packaging.

Jun 03, 2015
If so much extra energy was available from a battery using such a tiny, inexpensive sleeve then why is this technology not being built into electronic devices directly? Something is fishy here.

Jun 04, 2015
It is just a micro voltage regulator. Here is a link to the patent....
www.google.com/pa...20121943

Jun 04, 2015
Fake and lies.
No one makes electronic that can't take NiMH instead of ordinary batterys now days and alcaline batterys is realy emty when the volt fall down to that level.
Just look at a curve http://www.powers...00mA.png
Some electronics can't work at optimum levels when you insert NiMH and for that reason have this tecnoligy been around for many years.
If you have an old tranciver with ten dubble A and want to use NiMH and don't want to solder a permanent solution it is a choise but at permanent up-amp is a lot cheaper

Jun 04, 2015
Well spotted on the patent skills4u. More bollocks i'm afraid. they claim 7x improvement in power extraction, citing now 1.39V as the cut-off, for "sony" and "panasonic" batteries. No evidence given, the batteries were discharged and cut-off artificially at 1.39V, and this was the baseline.
No details offered as to how a suitable boost converter would fit within a 1mm sleeve either.
To run a camera you would need a peak current delivery of over an Amp, maybe 2 Amps, that's a pretty large inductor. The smallest types available today are 2mm high, and not curved.
It's solving an purely imaginary problem, with purely imaginary technology.

Jun 04, 2015
It's worth pointing out that any battery using this product will likely violate EMI standards, due to the LC switching frequency leaking into the output.

Jun 04, 2015
Its a copper arm ban for your batteries....that's stainless steel.
If we could make a capacitor that could pull all the remaining volts from a spent 1.5V battery while keeping its output close to 1.5volts there would be quite a bit more excitement.
The 21st century has given us psychosomatic technology!

Dug
Jun 04, 2015
The literary market for fiction is much, much larger than we realized. Especially when we include marketing fiction - as we should, since it is obviously fiction's most profitable component.

Jun 06, 2015
Only 2% of that poison is recycled and you wonder why I say we are a planet of morons? The planet of the apes is a planet of geniuses compared to us.

Jun 08, 2015
Note to my 100 or so 1.2V rechargeable batteries: sorry guys, PC World says you no longer work.

Jun 08, 2015

The planet of the apes is a planet of geniuses compared to us.


eeeh, last time I checked /Homo sapiens/ was still an ape.

Jun 10, 2015
So... You've used 20% of the battery and there's 8 times more energy in it waiting to be used eh?

I love that math. It makes it so believable.

Anyone with a voltmeter will notice batteries are less than 1V under load when they stop working.

Lies, propaganda.

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