Carnegie Mellon University Mechanical Engineering

The Department of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University is a leader in education and research in advanced manufacturing, bioengineering, computational engineering, energy and the environment, micro/nanoengineering, product design, and robotics. We empower students through hands-on learning, flexibility of course work, and multidisciplinary collaboration to solve real-world problems.

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Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Website
http://www.cmu.edu/me/index.html
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Cell & Microbiology

Cancer cells 'remove blindfold' to spread

Cancer cells spread by switching on and off abilities to sense their surroundings, move, hide and grow new tumors, a new study has found.

Neuroscience

Drug reverses age-related cognitive decline within days

Just a few doses of an experimental drug can reverse age-related declines in memory and mental flexibility in mice, according to a new study by UC San Francisco scientists. The drug, called ISRIB, has already been shown in ...

Earth Sciences

Geoscientists use zircon to trace origin of Earth's continents

Geoscientists have long known that some parts of the continents formed in the Earth's deep past, but the speed in which land rose above global seas—and the exact shapes that land masses formed—have so far eluded experts.

Materials Science

New method sees fibers in 3-D, uses it to estimate conductivity

As a vehicle travels through space at hypersonic speeds, the gases surrounding it generate heat at dangerous temperatures for the pilot and instrumentation inside. Designing a vehicle that can drive the heat away requires ...

Astronomy

Thermonuclear type-I X-ray bursts detected from MAXI J1807+132

An international team of astronomers has investigated an X-ray binary system known as MAXI J1807+132, using the NICER instrument aboard the International Space Station (ISS). They now report the detection of three thermonuclear ...

Ecology

Tomato's wild ancestor is a genomic reservoir for plant breeders

Thousands of years ago, people in South America began domesticating Solanum pimpinellifolium, a weedy plant with small, intensely flavored fruit. Over time, the plant evolved into S. lycopersicum—the modern cultivated tomato.

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