International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) is an international research organization located in Laxenburg, near Vienna, in Austria. IIASA conducts interdisciplinary scientific studies on environmental, economic, technological and social issues in the context of human dimensions of global change. IIASA's mission is "to provide insights and guidance to policymakers worldwide by finding solutions to global and universal problems through applied systems analysis in order to improve human and social wellbeing and to protect the environment." IIASA brings its experience of managing international tensions through science to today's global issues. Its multinational and multidisciplinary teams of researchers have a growing membership, now including the world's four largest economies.

Website
http://www.iiasa.ac.at/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Institute_for_Applied_Systems_Analysis
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Archaeology & Fossils

Ancient migration was choice, not chance, study finds

The degree of intentionality behind ancient ocean migrations, such as that to the Ryukyu Islands between Taiwan and mainland Japan, has been widely debated. Researchers used satellite-tracked buoys to simulate ancient wayward ...

Robotics

Robot hands one step closer to human thanks to AI algorithms

The Shadow Robot Dexterous Hand is a robot hand, with size, shape and movement capabilities similar to those of a human hand. To give the robotic hand the ability to learn how to manipulate objects researchers from WMG, University ...

Medications

Oral drug blocks SARS-CoV-2 transmission

Treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection with a new antiviral drug, MK-4482/EIDD-2801 or Molnupiravir, completely suppresses virus transmission within 24 hours, researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State ...

Ecology

Tiny treetop flowers foster incredible beetle biodiversity

Biologist have long known that rainforest treetops support a huge number of beetle species, but why these canopies are so rich in beetle diversity has remained a mystery. New research by my colleague Susan Kirmse and me shows ...