Norwegian University of Science and Technology

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, commonly known as NTNU, is located in Trondheim. NTNU is the second largest of the eight universities in Norway, and, as its name suggests, has the main national responsibility for higher education in engineering and technology. In addition to engineering and the natural and physical sciences, the university offers advanced degrees in other academic disciplines ranging from the social sciences, the arts, medicine, architecture and fine art.

Website
http://www.ntnu.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_University_of_Science_and_Technology
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Energy & Green Tech

Ammonia may be the key to making long-haul shipping green

SINTEF research scientist Andrea Gruber crunches numbers, albeit with the help of the supercomputer "Betzy." A seemingly infinite string of calculations is now answering open scientific questions about how a widespread and ...

Machine learning & AI

An AI for sea ice identification

If you've watched Netflix, shopped online, or run your robot vacuum cleaner, you've interacted with artificial intelligence, AI. AI is what allows computers to comb through an enormous amount of data to detect patterns or ...

Engineering

Making sure ships, other marine craft find their way

Nearly everything in our daily lives—from the electronic gizmos we all use, to the coffee we drink and the bananas we eat—relies on shipping. Ships worldwide transport roughly 11 billion tons of goods annually, which ...

Engineering

A robotic microplankton sniffer dog

Marine phytoplankton, or plant plankton, are incredibly important to life on Earth. As they go about their work of turning sunlight into energy, they produce fully 50 percent of the oxygen we breathe.

Robotics

An automated box on wheels—with personality

Robots are becoming more and more omnipresent in our lives, even though we may not notice. New research shows that when a boxy motorized hospital robot can talk, people find it funny and engaging. And that may help people ...

Engineering

Using ships themselves to monitor and predict waves

Shipping provides the very foundation for world trade, by moving an estimated 11 billion tons of goods a year from where they are produced to where they will be used. From TVs to toasters, soap to sugar—much of it moves ...

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