Washington University in St. Louis

The Washington University in St. Louis (WUST) was founded in 1853 in St. Louis, Missouri. WUST is a private non-sectarian university with undergraduate and graduate schools, a medical school and institutes. WUST has 22 Nobel Laureates affiliated with the university throughout its history. The student body is approximately 13,000 students. WUST has a $4 to $5 billion endowment and has a very high rating for research. The medical school is ranked 3rd in the nation and overall the entire university is ranked in the top 50 of all private universities world-wide. The Graduate School of Design and Architecture is rated in the top five in comparable schools world-wide.

Address
Campus Box 1089, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130.
E-mail
westerhousej@msnotes.wustl.edu
Website
http://www.wustl.edu/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_University_in_St._Louis
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Energy & Green Tech

Using microbes to make carbon-neutral fuel

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered a new way to train microbes to make a readily usable biofuel.

Engineering

A more efficient way to find a more efficient battery

The pace of progress in the renewable energy sector is limited not only by the technology to capture energy from the sun, the wind, the oceans or the Earth's radiant heat, but also by the ability to effectively store and ...

Energy & Green Tech

Simple tools reveal high-fidelity truth in lithium-ion batteries

Acceleration due to gravity here on Earth is about 9.8m/s2, but if you're trying to build a rocket that will escape Earth's pull, you're going to have to do better than that. You would need to factor in wind resistance, heat ...

Computer Sciences

Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem

In this era of big data, there are some problems in scientific computing that are so large, so complex and contain so much information that attempting to solve them would be too big of a task for most computers.

Computer Sciences

'Surfing attack' hacks Siri, Google with ultrasonic waves

Ultrasonic waves don't make a sound, but they can still activate Siri on your cellphone and have it make calls, take images or read the contents of a text to a stranger. All without the phone owner's knowledge.

page 1 from 2