Automotive

Researchers find way to make traffic models more efficient

Models that predict traffic volume for specific times and places are used to inform everything from traffic-light patterns to the app on your phone that tells you how to get from Point A to Point B. Researchers from North ...

Computer Sciences

Automated analysis of animal behavior through AI

Researchers have developed a new method that uses artificial intelligence to analyze animal behavior. This opens the door to longer-term in-depth studies in the field of behavioral science—while also helping to improve ...

Computer Sciences

This algorithm has opinions about your face

When two people meet, they instantly size each other up, making snap judgments about everything from the other person's age to their intelligence or trustworthiness based solely on the way they look. Those first impressions, ...

Machine learning & AI

New algorithm could simplify decisions for ship channel dredging

A new decision-support tool could become a game changer in the dredging of ship channels. Millions of dollars are at stake every time a major ship channel is cleaned up. Delays in dredging can cost even more by triggering ...

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Algorithm

In mathematics, computing, linguistics, and related subjects, an algorithm is a finite sequence of instructions, an explicit, step-by-step procedure for solving a problem, often used for calculation and data processing. It is formally a type of effective method in which a list of well-defined instructions for completing a task, will when given an initial state, proceed through a well-defined series of successive states, eventually terminating in an end-state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as probabilistic algorithms, incorporate randomness.

A partial formalization of the concept began with attempts to solve the Entscheidungsproblem (the "decision problem") posed by David Hilbert in 1928. Subsequent formalizations were framed as attempts to define "effective calculability" (Kleene 1943:274) or "effective method" (Rosser 1939:225); those formalizations included the Gödel-Herbrand-Kleene recursive functions of 1930, 1934 and 1935, Alonzo Church's lambda calculus of 1936, Emil Post's "Formulation 1" of 1936, and Alan Turing's Turing machines of 1936–7 and 1939.

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