Engineering

Marangoni surfer robots look and move like water bugs

From birds in the sky to fish in the sea, nature's creatures possess characteristics naturally perfected over millennia. Studying them leads engineers to create new technologies that are essential to our way of life today. ...

Robotics

A tactile sensing mechanism for soft robotic fingers

In recent years, numerous roboticists worldwide have been trying to develop robotic systems that can artificially replicate the human sense of touch. In addition, they have been trying to create increasingly realistic and ...

Engineering

Bionic jellyfish swim faster and more efficiently

Engineers at Caltech and Stanford University have developed a tiny prosthetic that enables jellyfish to swim faster and more efficiently than they normally do, without stressing the animals. The researchers behind the project ...

Robotics

Can sea star movement inspire better robots?

Have you ever seen a sea star move? To many of us, sea star seem motionless, like a rock on the ocean's floor, but in actuality, they have hundreds of tube feet attached to their underbelly. These feet stretch and contract ...

Robotics

Multi-joint, personalized soft exosuit breaks new ground

In the future, smart textile-based soft robotic exosuits could be worn by soldiers, fire fighters and rescue workers to help them traverse difficult terrain and arrive fresh at their destinations so that they can perform ...

Robotics

Robot transitions from soft to rigid

Even octopuses understand the importance of elbows. When these squishy, loose-limbed cephalopods need to make a precise movement—such as guiding food into their mouth—the muscles in their tentacles contract to create ...

Engineering

Novel 3-D printing technique yields high-performance composites

Nature has produced exquisite composite materials—wood, bone, teeth, and shells, for example—that combine light weight and density with desirable mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength and damage tolerance.

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