Computer Sciences

New system combines smartphone videos to create 4-D visualizations

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated that they can combine iPhone videos shot "in the wild" by separate cameras to create 4-D visualizations that allow viewers to watch action from various angles, or ...

Engineering

A small, wide-field-of-view camera built based on fish eyes

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in South Korea and one from the U.S. has built a small, wide-field-of-view camera based on the structure of fish eyes. In their paper published in the journal Nature ...

Engineering

Capturing moving subjects in still-life quality

Researchers at EPFL's Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory and the Wision Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a technique for building crystal-clear images of moving subjects. The team will ...

Computer Sciences

Digitize your dog into a computer game

Researchers from the University of Bath have developed motion capture technology that enables you to digitize your dog without a motion capture suit and using only one camera.

Computer Sciences

Light bulb vibrations yield eavesdropping data

In an era of digital eavesdropping where hackers employ a variety of means to take over built-in video cameras, peruse personal digital data and snoop on cellular conversations, researchers have finally seen the light.

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Camera

A camera is a device that records images, either as a still photograph or as moving images known as videos or movies. The term comes from the camera obscura (Latin for "dark chamber"), an early mechanism of projecting images where an entire room functioned as a real-time imaging system; the modern camera evolved from the camera obscura.

Cameras may work with the light of the visible spectrum or with other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. A camera generally consists of an enclosed hollow with an opening (aperture) at one end for light to enter, and a recording or viewing surface for capturing the light at the other end. A majority of cameras have a lens positioned in front of the camera's opening to gather the incoming light and focus all or part of the image on the recording surface. The diameter of the aperture is often controlled by a diaphragm mechanism, but some cameras have a fixed-size aperture.

A typical still camera takes one photo each time the user presses the shutter button. A typical movie camera continuously takes 24 film frames per second as long as the user holds down the shutter button.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA