Energy & Green Tech

Engineers go microbial to store energy, sequester carbon dioxide

By borrowing nature's blueprints for photosynthesis, Cornell University bioengineers have found a way to efficiently absorb and store large-scale, low-cost renewable energy from the sun—while sequestering atmospheric carbon ...

Energy & Green Tech

A blast of gas for better solar cells

Treating silicon with carbon dioxide gas in plasma processing brings simplicity and control to a key step for making solar cells.

Electronics & Semiconductors

Radiative cooler that cools down even under sunlight

Now that autumn is upon us, there is a large temperature gap between day and night. This is due to the temperature inversion caused by radiative cooling on the Earth's surface. Heat from the sun during the day causes its ...

Energy & Green Tech

A look inside a battery

What happens inside a battery at the microscopic level during charging and discharging processes? A team of scientists led by Prof. Dr. Gunther Wittstock of the University of Oldenburg's Chemistry Department recently presented ...

Energy & Green Tech

Can renewable energy really replace fossil fuels?

As global temperatures and energy demand rise simultaneously, the search for sustainable fuel sources is more urgent than ever. But how can renewable energy possibly scale up to replace the vast quantities of oil and gas ...

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Chemical thermodynamics

Chemical thermodynamics is the study of the interrelation of heat and work with chemical reactions or with physical changes of state within the confines of the laws of thermodynamics. Chemical thermodynamics involves not only laboratory measurements of various thermodynamic properties, but also the application of mathematical methods to the study of chemical questions and the spontaneity of processes.

The structure of chemical thermodynamics is based on the first two laws of thermodynamics. Starting from the first and second laws of thermodynamics, four equations called the "fundamental equations of Gibbs" can be derived. From these four, a multitude of equations, relating the thermodynamic properties of the thermodynamic system can be derived using relatively simple mathematics. This outlines the mathematical framework of chemical thermodynamics.

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