Automotive

BMW unveils car that can change color

BMW unveiled Wednesday the prototype of a car that can change color and showcases digital features like projecting driving data across the inside of the windshield.

Other

Esports seen as pathway to boost diversity in STEM careers

As a kid, Kevin Fair would take apart his Nintendo console, troubleshoot issues and put it back together again—experiences the Black entrepreneur says represented "a life trajectory changing moment" when he realized the ...

Computer Sciences

Teaching AI to accurately colorize marine plankton images

Plankton are fundamental to the marine ecosystem and an indispensable means of modern marine ecological management. Since previous studies have shown that zooplankton are insensitive to long wavelength (i.e., red) light, ...

Energy & Green Tech

Colorful solar panels could make the technology more attractive

Solar panels aren't just for rooftops anymore—some buildings even have these power-generating structures all over their facades. But as more buildings and public spaces incorporate photovoltaic technologies, their monotonous ...

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Color

Color or colour (see spelling differences) is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called red, green, blue and others. Color derives from the spectrum of light (distribution of light power versus wavelength) interacting in the eye with the spectral sensitivities of the light receptors. Color categories and physical specifications of color are also associated with objects, materials, light sources, etc., based on their physical properties such as light absorption, reflection, or emission spectra. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by their coordinates.

Because perception of color stems from the varying spectral sensitivity of different types of cone cells in the retina to different parts of the spectrum, colors may be defined and quantified by the degree to which they stimulate these cells. These physical or physiological quantifications of color, however, do not fully explain the psychophysical perception of color appearance.

The science of color is sometimes called chromatics, colorimetry, or simply color science. It includes the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics of electromagnetic radiation in the visible range (that is, what we commonly refer to simply as light).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA