Computer Sciences

Developing a digital twin

In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages, maybe even people, from location to location.

Computer Sciences

Water animation gets easier

From early story concepts to a theatrical release, full-length animated films can take years to create. One of the biggest time commitments comes during the animation process when the animators are simulating fluid materials, ...

Security

Two Russians charged in 'Evil Corp' global cybertheft ring

The Justice Department unsealed charges Thursday against the alleged leader and a top associate of a Russian cybercriminal gang that U.S. and British officials say developed and distributed malware used to steal at least ...

Security

New record set for cracking encryption keys

An international team of computer scientists had set a new record for two of the most important computational problems that are the basis for nearly all of the public-key cryptography that is currently used in the real world.

Computer Sciences

New streaming technology will change computer gaming

Streaming services, such as Netflix or Amazon Prime, are widely used. But the next wave of digital media is imminent: cloud gaming. This technology is similar to video-on-demand services. A computer game is run on a server ...

Automotive

Wayve unveils self-driving car trials in central London

Wayve, a machine learning company, founded in 2017 by alumni Dr. Alex Kendall, who completed his Ph.D. in Professor Roberto Cipolla's Machine Intelligence group, and Dr. Amar Shah, who completed his Ph.D. in Professor Zoubin ...

Internet

For Americans, mobile devices top for news: survey

Americans rely on their mobile devices for online news far more than desktop or laptop computers, building on a trend that began several years ago, a survey showed Wednesday.

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Computer

A computer is a machine that manipulates data according to a set of instructions.

Although mechanical examples of computers have existed through much of recorded human history, the first electronic computers were developed in the mid-20th century (1940–1945). These were the size of a large room, consuming as much power as several hundred modern personal computers (PCs). Modern computers based on integrated circuits are millions to billions of times more capable than the early machines, and occupy a fraction of the space. Simple computers are small enough to fit into a wristwatch, and can be powered by a watch battery. Personal computers in their various forms are icons of the Information Age and are what most people think of as "computers". The embedded computers found in many devices from MP3 players to fighter aircraft and from toys to industrial robots are however the most numerous.

The ability to store and execute lists of instructions called programs makes computers extremely versatile, distinguishing them from calculators. The Church–Turing thesis is a mathematical statement of this versatility: any computer with a certain minimum capability is, in principle, capable of performing the same tasks that any other computer can perform. Therefore computers ranging from a mobile phone to a supercomputer are all able to perform the same computational tasks, given enough time and storage capacity.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA