Business

Google awaits EU court verdict in anti-trust case

The European Union's second-highest court will rule Wednesday on whether antitrust authorities in Brussels went too far in handing Google a 2.4-billion-euro ($2.8-billion) fine for search engine dominance.

Business

Boeing 737 MAX negligence case ends with $237.5 mn settlement

Boeing shareholders have reached a $237.5 million out-of-court settlement with the US aircraft manufacturer's current and former directors in a 737 MAX aircraft safety negligence case, according to documents released Friday.

Security

Streaming site Twitch confirms hack

Amazon's popular live video streaming platform Twitch said Wednesday hackers had broken into its network after reports of exposed confidential company data surfaced online.

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Court

A court is a body, often a governmental institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes and dispense civil, criminal, or administrative justice in accordance with rules of law. In common law and civil law states, courts are the central means for dispute resolution, and it is generally understood that all persons have an ability to bring their claims before a court. Similarly, those accused of a crime have the right to present their defense before a court.

Court facilities range from a simple farmhouse for a village court in a rural community to huge buildings housing dozens of courtrooms in large cities.

A court is a kind of deliberative assembly with special powers, called its jurisdiction, or jus dicere, to decide certain kinds of questions or petitions put to it. According to William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England, a court is constituted by a minimum of three parties, namely, the actor, reus, and judex, though, often, courts consist of additional attorneys, bailiffs, reporters, and perhaps a jury.

The term "court" is often used to refer to the president of the court, also known as the "judge" or the "bench", or the panel of such officials. For example, in the United States, and other common law jurisdictions, the term "court" (in the case of U.S. federal courts) by law is used to describe the judge himself or herself.

In the United States, the legal authority of a court to take action is based on three pillars of power over the parties to the litigation: (1) Personal jurisdiction; (2) Subject matter jurisdiction; and (3) Venue.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA