Computer Sciences

Researchers create digital humans that learn complex movements

Researchers at Meta's Artificial Intelligence Research Lab (Facebook) in the U.S. and at the University of Twente's Neuromechanical Modelling and Engineering Lab in the Netherlands (led by Prof.dr.ir Massimo Sartori), have ...

Business

'Enormously risky': How NFTs lost their lustre

A slew of celebrity endorsements helped inflate a multi-billion dollar bubble around digital tokens over the past year, but cryptocurrencies are crashing and some fear NFTs could be next.

Engineering

Expert: Roads need to be 'smart.' Here's why.

Constant construction on your vacation route, jarring potholes during the winter and bridge collapses will continue until roads are "smart enough" to better prevent their own damage, says a Purdue University civil engineer.

Business

Vodafone calls up surging annual profit

British telecoms giant Vodafone on Tuesday logged surging annual net profit on rising sales and sliding tax, one day after revealing that an Emirati firm has become its biggest investor.

Telecom

Biden administration to release $45B for nationwide internet

The Biden administration is taking the first steps to release $45 billion to ensure that every U.S. resident has access to high-speed internet by roughly 2028, inviting governors and other leaders on Friday to start the application ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Final refrain for iPod as Apple stops production

Apple on Tuesday put out word it is no longer making iPods, the trend-setting MP3 players that transformed how people get music and gave rise to the iPhone.

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Digital

A digital system is a data technology that uses discrete (discontinuous) values. By contrast, non-digital (or analog) systems use a continuous range of values to represent information. Although digital representations are discrete, the information represented can be either discrete, such as numbers, letters or icons, or continuous, such as sounds, images, and other measurements of continuous systems.

The word digital comes from the same source as the word digit and digitus (the Latin word for finger), as fingers are used for discrete counting. It is most commonly used in computing and electronics, especially where real-world information is converted to binary numeric form as in digital audio and digital photography.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA