Electronics & Semiconductors

Movies of ultrafast electronic circuitry in space and time

Researchers at the University of Konstanz have successfully filmed the operations of extremely fast electronic circuitry in an electron microscope at a bandwidth of tens of terahertz. The study is published in Nature Communications.

Engineering

New technology revolutionizes 3-D metal printing

Selective LED-based melting (SLEDM)—the targeted melting of metal powder using high-power LED light sources—is the name of the new technology that a team led by Franz Haas, head of the Institute of Production Engineering ...

Engineering

New invention for more efficient atomic force microscopes

The basic principle of the atomic force microscope is very simple: an extremely thin, movable tip on a cantilever is moved over a surface that is being examined. Tiny forces on an atomic scale act between the tip and the ...

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Cathode ray

Cathode rays (also called an electron beam or e-beam) are streams of electrons observed in vacuum tubes, i.e. evacuated glass tubes that are equipped with at least two metal electrodes to which a voltage is applied, a cathode or negative electrode and an anode or positive electrode. They were discovered by German scientist Johann Hittorf in 1869 and in 1876 named by Eugen Goldstein kathodenstrahlen (cathode rays). Electrons were first discovered as the constituents of cathode rays. In 1897 British physicist J. J. Thompson showed the rays were composed of a previously unknown negatively charged particle, which was named electron.

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