Internet

Hackers got user data from Meta with forged request

Facebook owner Meta gave user information to hackers who pretended to be law enforcement officials last year, a company source said Wednesday, highlighting the risks of a measure used in urgent cases.

Computer Sciences

A new model to automatically detect and filter spam emails

Spam emails are undesired messages that are often sent to many random users in bulks. These messages can contain advertisements, but also phishing links or malware. The automatic filtering of emails and the identification ...

Internet

Google Docs comment feature exploited to distribute phishing links

A team of security researchers at Avanan is reporting that hackers are taking advantage of a Google Docs security vulnerability—one that takes advantage of a comment feature. They are claiming that they saw hackers using ...

Business

Swiss army backs home-grown IM service amid privacy concerns

The Swiss army has told its ranks to stop using foreign instant-messaging services like WhatsApp, Signal and Telegram for official communications. Instead, it's opting for a Swiss alternative—in part over concerns about ...

Internet

Who's got your mail? Google and Microsoft, mostly

Who really sends, receives and, most importantly perhaps, stores your business' email? Most likely Google and Microsoft, unless you live in China or Russia. And the market share for these two companies keeps growing.

Security

A deep learning-based framework to detect phishing websites

Most of us will have received a scam email that looks like it has come from our bank or an online store or other company or organization. They can look genuine but usually hidden within are malicious links that once clicked ...

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E-mail

Electronic mail, often abbreviated as email or e-mail, is a method of exchanging digital messages, designed primarily for human use. E-mail systems are based on a store-and-forward model in which e-mail computer server systems accept, forward, deliver and store messages on behalf of users, who only need to connect to the e-mail infrastructure, typically an e-mail server, with a network-enabled device (e.g., a personal computer) for the duration of message submission or retrieval. Rarely is e-mail transmitted directly from one user's device to another's.

An electronic mail message consists of two components, the message header, and the message body, which is the email's content. The message header contains control information, including, minimally, an originator's email address and one or more recipient addresses. Usually additional information is added, such as a subject header field.

Originally a text-only communications medium, email is extended to carry multi-media content attachments, which were standardized in with RFC 2045 through RFC 2049, collectively called, Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME).

The foundation for today's global Internet e-mail service was created in the early ARPANET and standards for encoding of messages were proposed as early as, for example, in 1973 (RFC 561). An e-mail sent in the early 1970s looked very similar to one sent on the Internet today. Conversion from the ARPANET to the Internet in the early 1980s produced the core of the current service.

Network-based email was initially exchanged on the ARPANET in extensions to the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), but is today carried by the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), first published as Internet Standard 10 (RFC 821) in 1982. In the process of transporting email messages between systems, SMTP communicates delivery parameters using a message envelope separately from the message (headers and body) itself.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA