Robotics

Engineers find ankle exoskeleton aids running

Running is great exercise but not everyone feels great doing it. In hopes of boosting physical activity—and possibly creating a new mode of transportation—engineers at Stanford University are studying devices that people ...

Charting a path to powered exoskeletons

Exoskeletons are devices that are worn for protection or support—like a suit of armor or a helmet. Those and other passive devices have been around for millennia, but today's researchers are developing powered exoskeleton ...

Robotics

A promising step in returning bipedal mobility

Engineers at Caltech have launched a new research initiative aimed at restoring natural and stable locomotion to individuals with walking deficiencies that result from spinal cord injuries and strokes.

Engineering

Movement-enhancing exoskeletons may impair decision making

As engineers make strides in the design of wearable, electronically active, and responsive leg braces, arm supports, and full-body suits, collectively known as exoskeletons, researchers at MIT are raising an important question: ...

Robotics

Robotic trousers could help disabled people walk again

Could the answer to mobility problems one day be as easy as pulling on a pair of trousers? A research team led by Bristol University's Professor Jonathan Rossiter has recently unveiled a prototype pair of robotic trousers ...

Engineering

Exoskeleton designed to help paraplegics walk

An exoskeleton that can restore mobility for people confined to wheelchairs is always met with interest by medical professionals and by those affected. This time around, a lot of interest is evidenced in a team's effort to ...

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Exoskeleton

An exoskeleton is the external skeleton that supports and protects an animal's body, in contrast to the internal skeleton (endoskeleton) of, for example, a human. In popular usage, some of the larger kinds of exoskeletons are known as "shells". Examples of exoskeleton animals include insects such as grasshoppers and cockroaches, and crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters. The shells of the various groups of shelled mollusks, including those of snails, clams, tusk shells, chitons and nautilus, are also exoskeletons.

Mineralized exoskeletons first appeared in the fossil record about 550 million years ago, and their evolution is considered by some to have played a role in the subsequent Cambrian explosion of animals.[citation needed]

Some animals, such as the tortoise, have both an endoskeleton and an exoskeleton.

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