Engineering

Exoskeleton keeps up with flow on the streets of New York

ReWalk Robotics, is a medical device company which has created ReWalk, an exoskeleton. The company team is focused on exoskeletons that can allow wheelchair-bound people to stand up and walk—not just in the rehab rooms ...

Robotics

Study examines robotic exoskeletons and bodily fit

A shoddily tailored suit or a shrunken T-shirt may not be the most stylish, but wearing them is unlikely to hurt more than your reputation. An ill-fitting robotic exoskeleton on the battlefield or factory floor, however, ...

Robotics

Engineers find ankle exoskeleton aids running

Running is great exercise but not everyone feels great doing it. In hopes of boosting physical activity—and possibly creating a new mode of transportation—engineers at Stanford University are studying devices that people ...

Robotics

A new bio-inspired joint model to design robotic exoskeletons

Recent advances in the field of robotics have enabled the fabrication of increasingly sophisticated robotic limbs and exoskeletons. Robotic exoskeletons are essentially wearable 'shells' made of different robotic parts. Exoskeletons ...

Engineering

A suit-X trio designed to support workers: Meet MAX

(Tech Xplore)—Not all of us park our bodies in a chair in the morning and cross our legs to do our work. In fact, just think of vast numbers of workers doing physically demanding or just physically repetitive tasks including ...

Robotics

Ski-worthy exoskeleton set to enhance experience

San Francisco-based company called Roam Robotics is to provide its first exoskeleton and it's aimed at skiers. Skiers? Sounds strange. One would think the last thing a skier would want to think about is a heavy suit with ...

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Exoskeleton

An exoskeleton is the external skeleton that supports and protects an animal's body, in contrast to the internal skeleton (endoskeleton) of, for example, a human. In popular usage, some of the larger kinds of exoskeletons are known as "shells". Examples of exoskeleton animals include insects such as grasshoppers and cockroaches, and crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters. The shells of the various groups of shelled mollusks, including those of snails, clams, tusk shells, chitons and nautilus, are also exoskeletons.

Mineralized exoskeletons first appeared in the fossil record about 550 million years ago, and their evolution is considered by some to have played a role in the subsequent Cambrian explosion of animals.[citation needed]

Some animals, such as the tortoise, have both an endoskeleton and an exoskeleton.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA