Automotive

Energy Dept. backs $2.5B loan to GM venture for EV batteries

A joint venture between General Motors and South Korean battery company LG Energy Solution is set to receive a $2.5 billion loan from the Energy Department to build battery cell factories for electric vehicles in three states.

Energy & Green Tech

First steps toward high-speed motors for fuel cell components

The transport sector is transforming towards climate-friendly powertrains with significantly reduced CO2 emissions. The electrification of powertrains remains a major challenge not only for trucks, buses, trains, and ships ...

Energy & Green Tech

Examining a new bio-inspired proton exchange membrane fuel cell

A team from the Department of Energy Engineering at the University of Seville has developed an experimental research focused on the design of a bio-inspired PEM fuel cell. The model they have obtained has reached a maximum ...

Energy & Green Tech

Fully scalable all-perovskite tandem solar modules

Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a prototype for fully scalable all-perovskite tandem solar modules. These modules have an efficiency of up to 19.1% with an aperture area of 12.25 ...

Engineering

Building the world's most durable hydrogen fuel cell

Researchers at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have developed a new hydrogen fuel cell which is not only the world's most durable to date, but is also more cost-effective, paving way for a wider ...

Engineering

Water distribution in fuel cells made visible in 4D

Teams from Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and University College London (UCL) have visualized the water distribution in a fuel cell in three dimensions and in real time for the first time by evaluating neutron data from the ...

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Fuel cell

A fuel cell is an electrochemical conversion device. It produces electricity from fuel (on the anode side) and an oxidant (on the cathode side), which react in the presence of an electrolyte. The reactants flow into the cell, and the reaction products flow out of it, while the electrolyte remains within it. Fuel cells can operate virtually continuously as long as the necessary flows are maintained.

Fuel cells are different from electrochemical cell batteries in that they consume reactant from an external source, which must be replenished – a thermodynamically open system. By contrast, batteries store electrical energy chemically and hence represent a thermodynamically closed system.

Many combinations of fuels and oxidants are possible. A hydrogen fuel cell uses hydrogen as its fuel and oxygen (usually from air) as its oxidant. Other fuels include hydrocarbons and alcohols. Other oxidants include chlorine and chlorine dioxide.

The principle of the fuel cell had been demonstrated by Sir William Grove in 1839, and other investigators had experimented with various forms of fuel cell. The first practical fuel cell was developed by Francis Thomas Bacon in 1959.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA