Energy & Green Tech

Lights out? Swiss brace for looming power shortages

Switzerland is among the world's wealthiest countries, but its reliance on Russian gas and French nuclear power—both in short supply—has it bracing for power shortages and even blackouts this winter.

Energy & Green Tech

Where to get the facts behind hydropower

To further the potential benefits of the nation's hydropower resources, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed and maintain a comprehensive water energy digital platform called HydroSource that informs ...

Engineering

Retrofitting untapped dams

Although more than 92,000 dams populate the country, the vast majority—about 89,000—do not generate electricity through hydropower.

Energy & Green Tech

How will hydropower bolster a renewable energy world?

In the last few years, U.S. summers have looked a little apocalyptic. Wildfires raged across the West Coast. Floods stole homes. In July 2021, the Earth's hottest month ever was recorded, and power grids flickered, causing ...

page 1 from 3

Hydropower

Hydropower, hydraulic power, hydrokinetic power or water power is power that is derived from the force or energy of falling water, which may be harnessed for useful purposes. Since ancient times, hydropower has been used for irrigation and the operation of various mechanical devices, such as watermills, sawmills, textile mills, dock cranes, and domestic lifts. Since the early 20th century, the term is used almost exclusively in conjunction with the modern development of hydro-electric power, the energy of which could be transmitted considerable distance between where it was created to where it was consumed.

Another previous method used to transmit energy had employed a trompe, which produces compressed air from falling water, that could then be piped to power other machinery at a distance from the energy source.

Water's power is manifested in hydrology, by the forces of water on the riverbed and banks of a river. When a river is in flood, it is at its most powerful, and moves the greatest amount of sediment. This higher force results in the removal of sediment and other material from the riverbed and banks of the river, locally causing erosion, transport and, with lower flow, sedimentation downstream.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA