Energy & Green Tech

Engineers develop flexible lithium battery for wearable electronics

The rapid development of flexible and wearable electronics is giving rise to an exciting range of applications, from smart watches and flexible displays—such as smart phones, tablets, and TV—to smart fabrics, smart glass, ...

Energy & Green Tech

Using crumpled graphene balls to make better batteries

Lithium metal-based batteries have the potential to turn the battery industry upside down. With the theoretically ultra-high capacity of lithium metal used by itself, this new type of battery could power everything from personal ...

Energy & Green Tech

Surprising discovery could lead to better batteries

A collaboration led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has observed an unexpected phenomenon in lithium-ion batteries—the most common type of battery used to power cell ...

Energy & Green Tech

Taming 'dendrites' could bring better lithium-ion batteries

Researchers have learned the mechanisms behind a common type of failure in lithium-ion batteries caused by the formation and growth of "dendrites," findings that could aid in the design of faster-charging and longer-lasting ...

Energy & Green Tech

Nanomaterials and lithium rechargeable batteries

(TechXplore)—In a review article in Nature Energy, Yongming Sun, Nian Liu, and Yi Cui from Stanford University survey how nanomaterials have advanced the field of lithium rechargeable batteries and what obstacles still ...

Energy & Green Tech

Controlling lithium metal deposits using different metal substrates

(Tech Xplore)—Cell phones, laptops, and other electronic devices that have rechargeable batteries use lithium ion batteries. Lithium batteries have a high energy density. Fewer cells are needed to power a device, which ...

Energy & Green Tech

Sony pegs 2020 as year of its high capacity battery

(Phys.org)—Instant crowd pleaser: Any headline that promises more battery life for smartphones. And why wouldn't it be a crowd-pleaser, considering the hassles in running out of juice when you need it the most?

Engineering

Victory Motorcycles introducing all-electric addition to its lineup

Victory Motorcycles has introduced its Empulse TT, the first all-electric addition to the Victory lineup. Features include adjustable suspension featuring a single rear shock and inverted front forks; dual-disk front brakes ...

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Lithium-ion battery

Lithium-ion batteries (sometimes abbreviated Li-ion batteries) are a type of rechargeable battery in which lithium ions move from the anode to cathode during discharge, and from the cathode to the anode when charged.

Lithium ion batteries are common in consumer electronics. They are one of the most popular types of battery for portable electronics, with one of the best energy-to-weight ratios, no memory effect, and a slow loss of charge when not in use. In addition to uses for consumer electronics, lithium-ion batteries are growing in popularity for defense, automotive, and aerospace applications due to their high energy density. However, certain kinds of mistreatment may cause conventional Li-ion batteries to explode.

The three primary functional components of a lithium ion battery are the anode, cathode, and electrolyte, for which a variety of materials may be used. Commercially, the most popular material for the anode is graphite. The cathode is generally one of three materials: a layered oxide, such as lithium cobalt oxide, one based on a polyanion, such as lithium iron phosphate, or a spinel, such as lithium manganese oxide, although materials such as TiS2 (titanium disulfide) were originally used. Depending on the choice of material for the anode, cathode, and electrolyte the voltage, capacity, life, and safety of a lithium ion battery can change dramatically. Recently novel architectures have been employed to improve the performance of these batteries. Lithium ion batteries are not to be confused with lithium batteries, the key difference being that lithium batteries are primary batteries containing metallic lithium while lithium-ion batteries are secondary batteries containing an intercalation anode material.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA