Security

Supply-chain hack attacks are worrying investigators

What do you know about supply-chain attacks? In January, an article in CSO said it's when a weak link in your enterprise security might lie with partners and suppliers. It's when someone infiltrates your system through ...

Security

How a personality trait puts you at risk for cybercrime

Impulse online shopping, downloading music and compulsive email use are all signs of a certain personality trait that make you a target for malware attacks. New research from Michigan State University examines the behaviors—both ...

Security

Virobot: How to say your PC is toast, in French?

A ransomware-flavored Virobot with keylogger capabilities was found to be capable of enslaving personal computers in a botnet, reported a number of sites including HotHardware. It was affecting targets in the United States.

Security

PowerHammer is wake-up call to data-stealing through power lines

Can security sleuths ever complain there's nothing left to do? The answer is obvious, and one more path to mischief has been recognized in the form of power supplies serving as a data exfiltration tool. It appears that malware ...

Security

Powerful snooping Android malware spotted by Kaspersky Lab

Kaspersky Lab malware researchers have found spying capabilities in Android malware. The malware is dubbed Skygofree. How ambitious is it? Kaspersky Lab Daily commented that Skygofree was "overflowing" with functions.

Security

Inside the fight against malware attacks

When malicious software attacks, computer scientists and security researchers want to know how the attackers got into what was supposed to be a secure system, and what they're actually doing that's causing problems for users. ...

Security

How malware infects apps

Malicious software on popular mobile platforms such as iOS and Android is at best a nuisance and at worst a security threat to individuals and businesses.

Software

Microsoft patches document exploit vulnerability

(Tech Xplore)—Many malware stories take the same story line, spread when computer victims open email attachments that enable installation of malware on their devices.

Security

Cybersecurity's weakest link is humans

There is a common thread that connects the hack into the sluicegate controllers of the Bowman Avenue dam in Rye, New York; the breach that compromised 20 million federal employee records at the Office of Personnel Management; ...

page 1 from 3

Malware

Malware, short for malicious software, is software designed to infiltrate or damage a computer system without the owner's informed consent. The expression is a general term used by computer professionals to mean a variety of forms of hostile, intrusive, or annoying software or program code. The term "computer virus" is sometimes used as a catch-all phrase to include all types of malware, including true viruses.

Software is considered malware based on the perceived intent of the creator rather than any particular features. Malware includes computer viruses, worms, trojan horses, most rootkits, spyware, dishonest adware, crimeware and other malicious and unwanted software. In law, malware is sometimes known as a computer contaminant, for instance in the legal codes of several U. S. states, including California and West Virginia.

Malware is not the same as defective software, that is, software which has a legitimate purpose but contains harmful bugs.

Preliminary results from Symantec published in 2008 suggested that "the release rate of malicious code and other unwanted programs may be exceeding that of legitimate software applications." According to F-Secure, "As much malware [was] produced in 2007 as in the previous 20 years altogether." Malware's most common pathway from criminals to users is through the Internet: primarily by e-mail and the World Wide Web.

The prevalence of malware as a vehicle for organized Internet crime, along with the general inability of traditional anti-malware protection platforms to protect against the continuous stream of unique and newly produced professional malware, has seen the adoption of a new mindset for businesses operating on the Internet - the acknowledgment that some sizable percentage of Internet customers will always be infected for some reason or other, and that they need to continue doing business with infected customers. The result is a greater emphasis on back-office systems designed to spot fraudulent activities associated with advanced malware operating on customers computers.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA