Consumer & Gadgets

'Vultur' malware uses new technique to steal banking credentials

A team of researchers at the security firm ThreatFabric is reporting on their website blog page that they have found instances of a new kind of malware in Android apps downloaded from Google Play that attempt to steal banking ...

Security

Hiding malware inside AI neural networks

A trio of researchers at Cornell University has found that it is possible to hide malware code inside of AI neural networks. Zhi Wang, Chaoge Liu and Xiang Cui have posted a paper describing their experiments with injecting ...

Consumer & Gadgets

New malware detection for Android at the source code level

There are numerous malware detection and antivirus apps for mobile devices running the Android operating system. However, a team in China introduces a new approach that can detect malicious activity at the source code level. ...

Software

Hackers use a bug to evade macOS defenses

Lauded for years as the system able to best prevent malware infection, macOS recently fell victim to an operating system vulnerability that hackers used to circumvent all of Apple's system defenses.

Security

New Android malware uses WhatsApp to spread

A new form of Android malware has begun spreading itself by creating auto-replies in WhatsApp. Check Point Research recently discovered the malware in a fake application on Google Play.

Consumer & Gadgets

Malware targeting Apple's M1-based computers found

Security researcher Patrick Wardle is claiming on his Objective-See website that he has found an instance of malware that targets Apple computers running the M1 chipset. Apple began Mac Mini, Macbook Pro and the Macbook Air ...

Software

Apple error approves MacOS malware

Oops. Apple, which recently stepped up efforts to guarantee malware is tracked and blocked before it can infect its Macs, has acknowledged the first breach of its notarization process.

Security

Avoiding malware on the move

Mobile devices are a fairly ubiquitous feature of our lives. Some would say that their huge and yet compact computing power has made life easier for millions of people by providing information, entertainment, and services ...

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Malware

Malware, short for malicious software, is software designed to infiltrate or damage a computer system without the owner's informed consent. The expression is a general term used by computer professionals to mean a variety of forms of hostile, intrusive, or annoying software or program code. The term "computer virus" is sometimes used as a catch-all phrase to include all types of malware, including true viruses.

Software is considered malware based on the perceived intent of the creator rather than any particular features. Malware includes computer viruses, worms, trojan horses, most rootkits, spyware, dishonest adware, crimeware and other malicious and unwanted software. In law, malware is sometimes known as a computer contaminant, for instance in the legal codes of several U. S. states, including California and West Virginia.

Malware is not the same as defective software, that is, software which has a legitimate purpose but contains harmful bugs.

Preliminary results from Symantec published in 2008 suggested that "the release rate of malicious code and other unwanted programs may be exceeding that of legitimate software applications." According to F-Secure, "As much malware [was] produced in 2007 as in the previous 20 years altogether." Malware's most common pathway from criminals to users is through the Internet: primarily by e-mail and the World Wide Web.

The prevalence of malware as a vehicle for organized Internet crime, along with the general inability of traditional anti-malware protection platforms to protect against the continuous stream of unique and newly produced professional malware, has seen the adoption of a new mindset for businesses operating on the Internet - the acknowledgment that some sizable percentage of Internet customers will always be infected for some reason or other, and that they need to continue doing business with infected customers. The result is a greater emphasis on back-office systems designed to spot fraudulent activities associated with advanced malware operating on customers computers.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA