Engineering

New, electricity-free desalination method shows promise

Researchers from The Australian National University have proposed a new method for desalinating water that avoids many of the unwanted side effects of traditional desalinating techniques and that reduces the energy required ...

Energy & Green Tech

Ocean power: A green option failing to make waves

The tidal power plant on the Rance river in Brittany, France, stands as a reminder of the underexploited potential of energy generation from ocean tides, waves and warmth.

Energy & Green Tech

How to pull carbon dioxide out of seawater

As carbon dioxide continues to build up in the Earth's atmosphere, research teams around the world have spent years seeking ways to remove the gas efficiently from the air. Meanwhile, the world's number one "sink" for carbon ...

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Seawater

Seawater is water from a sea or ocean. On average, seawater in the world's oceans has a salinity of about 3.5%. This means that every 1 kg of seawater has approximately 35 grams of dissolved salts (mostly, but not entirely, the ions of sodium chloride: Na+, Cl-). The average density of seawater at the surface of the ocean is 1.025 g/ml; seawater is denser than freshwater (which reaches a maximum density of 1.000 g/ml at a temperature of 4°C) because of the added mass of the salts. The freezing point of sea water decreases with increasing salinity and is about -2°C (28.4°F) at 35 gram per liter.

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