Computer Sciences

Turning an analysis of Asimov's Foundation into art

In recent years, numerous computer scientists and artists worldwide have worked on projects that merge digital art and computer science. For instance, some introduced computational models that can create original artworks, ...

Robotics

Using bundles of fibers, robots mimic nature

Octopus tentacles can move in many directions, but also form stiff joint-like structures for more precise movements. Caterpillars can travel by using inchworm movements, as well as coil up and propel themselves away from ...

Computer Sciences

Deep-learning–based image analysis is now just a click away

Under an initiative by EPFL's Center for Imaging, a team of engineers from EPFL and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid have developed a plugin that makes it easier to incorporate artificial intelligence into image analysis ...

Machine learning & AI

Improving machine learning for materials design

A new approach can train a machine learning model to predict the properties of a material using only data obtained through simple measurements, saving time and money compared with those currently used. It was designed by ...

Computer Sciences

DRNets can solve Sudoku, speed scientific discovery

Say you're driving with a friend in a familiar neighborhood, and the friend asks you to turn at the next intersection. The friend doesn't say which way to turn, but since you both know it's a one-way street, it's understood.

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Science

Science (from the Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge") refers to any systematic knowledge-base or prescriptive practice that is capable of resulting in a prediction or predictable type of outcome. In this sense, science may refer to a highly skilled technique or practice.

In its more restricted contemporary sense, science refers to a system of acquiring knowledge based on scientific method, and to the organized body of knowledge gained through such research. This article focuses on the more restricted use of the word. Science as discussed in this article is sometimes called experimental science to differentiate it from applied science—the application of scientific research to specific human needs—although the two are often interconnected.

Science is a continuing effort to discover and increase human knowledge and understanding through disciplined research. Using controlled methods, scientists collect observable evidence of natural or social phenomena, record measurable data relating to the observations, and analyze this information to construct theoretical explanations of how things work. The methods of scientific research include the generation of hypotheses about how phenomena work, and experimentation that tests these hypotheses under controlled conditions. Scientists are also expected to publish their information so other scientists can do similar experiments to double-check their conclusions. The results of this process enable better understanding of past events, and better ability to predict future events of the same kind as those that have been tested.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA