Electronics & Semiconductors

Building a 900-pixel imaging sensor using an atomically thin material

A team of researchers at Penn State University has developed a 900-pixel imaging sensor using an atomically thin material. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, the group describes how they built their ...

Business

Chip giant TSMC shares surge on Buffett stake

Shares in Taiwan's TSMC soared on Tuesday after Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway confirmed it had taken a close to $5 billion stake in a major boost of confidence for the semiconductor giant.

Engineering

An alternate route to semiconductor production

Semiconductors are essential components in many modern technologies, including computers, digital cameras, LEDs, automobiles, and solar panels. Despite their prevalence, current methods to produce semiconductors are energy ...

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Semiconductor

A semiconductor is a material that has a resistivity value between that of a conductor and an insulator. The conductivity of a semiconductor material can be varied under an external electrical field. Devices made from semiconductor materials are the foundation of modern electronics, including radio, computers, telephones, and many other devices. Semiconductor devices include the transistor, solar cells, many kinds of diodes including the light-emitting diode, the silicon controlled rectifier, and digital and analog integrated circuits. Solar photovoltaic panels are large semiconductor devices that directly convert light energy into electrical energy. In a metallic conductor, current is carried by the flow of electrons. In semiconductors, current can be carried either by the flow of electrons or by the flow of positively-charged "holes" in the electron structure of the material.

Silicon is used to create most semiconductors commercially. Dozens of other materials are used, including germanium, gallium arsenide, and silicon carbide. A pure semiconductor is often called an “intrinsic” semiconductor. The conductivity, or ability to conduct, of semiconductor material can be drastically changed by adding other elements, called “impurities” to the melted intrinsic material and then allowing the melt to solidify into a new and different crystal. This process is called "doping".

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