Robotics

Soft skin-like robots you can put in your pocket

Stretchable skin-like robots that can be rolled up and put in your pocket have been developed by a University of Bristol team using a new way of embedding artificial muscles and electrical adhesion into soft materials.

Engineering

Multimaterial 3-D printing manufactures complex objects, fast

3-D printers are revolutionizing manufacturing by allowing users to create any physical shape they can imagine on-demand. However, most commercial printers are only able to build objects from a single material at a time and ...

Engineering

Combining experts and automation in 3-D printing

Researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering have developed a novel approach to optimizing soft material 3-D printing. The researchers' Expert-Guided Optimization (EGO) method combines expert judgment ...

Robotics

New soft rubber for creating self-healing robots

(Tech Xplore)—A team of researchers at Vrije Universiteit Brussel has developed a type of rubber that can be used with robots to allow them to self-heal when cut. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, ...

Robotics

Smaller, smarter, softer robotic arm for endoscopic surgery

Flexible endoscopes can snake through narrow passages to treat difficult to reach areas of the body. However, once they arrive at their target, these devices rely on rigid surgical tools to manipulate or remove tissue. These ...

Robotics

Researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

Imagine rescuers searching for people in the rubble of a collapsed building. Instead of digging through the debris by hand or having dogs sniff for signs of life, they bring out a small, air-tight cylinder. They place the ...

Engineering

3-D-printed robots with shock-absorbing skins

Anyone who's watched drone videos or an episode of "BattleBots" knows that robots can break—and often it's because they don't have the proper padding to protect themselves.

Engineering

Transmitting energy in soft materials

Soft materials are great at damping energy—that's why rubber tires are so good at absorbing the shock of bumps and potholes. But if researchers are going to build autonomous soft systems, like soft robots, they'll need ...

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