Security

Akamai speaks out on uptick of DDoS attacks

Internet security's big bully: Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) which messes up normal traffic of a targeted server or network with a flood of HTTP requests, malformed packets. Crash, bam boom. Missions accomplished. ...

Security

Patent application looks at smart doorbell sniffing, ACLU reacts

Facial recognition tech added to video-laden doorbells to track "suspicious" people? Sounds like a thorny concept, as people are still reeling over privacy and the lack thereof in very recent times. "Face" it, facial recognition ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Google rolled out fix for Nest cam look-through

Finders, weepers. That seemed to be a suitable tweak to the old saying, when the news hit that a former owner of a used Nest Indoor Cam could access the new owner's video feed.

Consumer & Gadgets

Movi camera and companion app impart cinema vibes

A camera is being introduced for when you want to capture special moments of a friend reaching the top of a hill or reeling in a fish or anything else special. Movi is a new live event camera that lets you get very filmy— ...

Machine learning & AI

How AI could help you learn sign language

Sign languages aren't easy to learn and are even harder to teach. They use not just hand gestures but also mouthings, facial expressions and body posture to communicate meaning. This complexity means professional teaching ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Before you buy, consider privacy please

This weekend, many folks will be poring over retail circulars, online ads and promotions, doing their research to get ahead on the best deals for Black Friday gifts.

Business

Chinese snooping tech spreads to nations vulnerable to abuse

When hundreds of video cameras with the power to identify and track individuals started appearing in the streets of Belgrade as part of a major surveillance project, some protesters began having second thoughts about joining ...

Computer Sciences

DNA techniques could transform facial recognition technology

When police in London recently trialled a new facial recognition system, they made a worrying and embarrassing mistake. At the Notting Hill Carnival, the technology made roughly 35 false matches between known suspects and ...

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Video camera

A video camera is a camera used for electronic motion picture acquisition, initially developed by the television industry but now common in other applications as well. The earliest video cameras were those of John Logie Baird, based on the electromechanical Nipkow disk and used by the BBC in experimental broadcasts through the 1930s. All-electronic designs based on the cathode ray tube, such as Vladimir Zworykin's Iconoscope and Philo T. Farnsworth's Image dissector, supplanted the Baird system by the 1940s and remained in wide use until the 1980s, when cameras based on solid-state image sensors such as CCDs (and later CMOS active pixel sensors) eliminated common problems with tube technologies such as burn-in and made digital video workflow practical.

Video cameras are used primarily in two modes. The first, characteristic of much early television, is what might be called a live broadcast, where the camera feeds real time images directly to a screen for immediate observation; in addition to live television production, such usage is characteristic of security, military/tactical, and industrial operations where surreptitious or remote viewing is required. The second is to have the images recorded to a storage device for archiving or further processing; for many years, videotape has been the primary format used for this purpose, but optical disc media, hard disk, and flash memory are all increasingly used. Recorded video is used not only in television and film production, but also surveillance and monitoring tasks where unattended recording of a situation is required for later analysis.

Modern video cameras have numerous designs and uses, not all of which resemble the early television cameras.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA