Advanced Science

Advanced Science is an interdisciplinary premium open access journal covering fundamental and applied research in materials science, physics and chemistry, medical and life sciences, as well as engineering. Advanced Science has a 2019 Impact Factor of 15.84 (Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2020)).

Publisher
Wiley
Website
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/21983844
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Engineering

Single-cell-driven, tri-channel encryption meta-displays

Pockets of the POSTECH campus are turning into metaverse-ready spaces. Leveraging lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic, POSTECH has employed metaverse learning to enable students to conduct experiments and receive training ...

Robotics

Steerable soft robots could enhance medical applications

Borrowing from methods used to produce optical fibers, researchers from EPFL and Imperial College have created fiber-based soft robots with advanced motion control that integrate other functionalities, such as electric and ...

Hardware

Researchers develop a phase-change key for new hardware security

As more and more data are being shared and stored digitally, the number of data breaches taking place around the world is on the rise. Scientists are exploring new ways to secure and protect data from increasingly sophisticated ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

Improving wearable medical sensors with ultrathin mesh

On-skin medical sensors and wearable health devices are important health care tools that must be incredibly flexible and ultrathin so they can move with the human body. In addition, the technology has to withstand bending ...

Engineering

Objects can now be 3D-printed in opaque resin

A team of EPFL engineers has developed a 3D-printing method that uses light to make objects out of opaque resin in a matter of seconds. Their breakthrough could have promising applications in the biomedical industry, such ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

New research harnesses the power of movement

Harvesting energy from the day-to-day movements of the human body and turning it into useful electrical energy, is the focus of a new piece of research involving a Northumbria University Professor.

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