Hi Tech & Innovation news

Engineering

Researchers use grasshoppers to detect explosive chemical vapors

The year was 2016 and the headlines talked about something called cyborg insects and reflected on a branch of technology called biorobotics.

Robotics

Drone designs arise from butterfly study: Undulating flight saves monarchs' energy

In a finding that could benefit drone design, award-winning research by a doctoral student at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) shows that the undulating flight paths of monarch butterflies are actually more energy ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Patent talk: Apple crease-free foldable sparks hopes for fresh phone

A patent application from Apple is all about a foldable device with a clever hinge design and it has tech watchers beating the drums for what Apple could bring to the table in folding phones with, if any, a difference.

Hi Tech & Innovation

US lets autonomous vehicle bypass human-driver safety rules

For the first time, the U.S. government's highway safety agency has approved a company's request to deploy a self-driving vehicle that doesn't meet federal safety standards that apply to cars and trucks driven by humans.

Hi Tech & Innovation

Self-driving the longest route yet

A project researching the latest autonomous vehicle technologies has successfully completed a 230-mile self-navigated journey on UK roads.

Energy & Green Tech

Inkjet printing technology for battery elements

A group of St. Petersburg scientists has proposed a new method of manufacturing electrodes for lithium-ion batteries that power laptops, smartphones and tablets. The researchers have shown that these elements can be printed ...

Engineering

Smart city or not? Now you can see how Australian cities compare

The highest-ranked areas in an Australia-wide assessment of smart city performance are all in metropolitan regions with higher population densities. "Australia's 60 top-performing local government areas house more than quarter ...

Engineering

Cloning musical heritage in the key of 3-D

When Mina Jang played the same melodious tune on two different flutes behind a screen, she said the examiners grading her couldn't tell the difference.