Electronics & Semiconductors news

Electronics & Semiconductors

Building a 900-pixel imaging sensor using an atomically thin material

A team of researchers at Penn State University has developed a 900-pixel imaging sensor using an atomically thin material. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, the group describes how they built their ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

Researcher finds a sweet new way to print microchip patterns on curvy surfaces

NIST scientist Gary Zabow had never intended to use candy in his lab. It was only as a last resort that he had even tried burying microscopic magnetic dots in hardened chunks of sugar—hard candy, basically—and sending ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

Researchers eye embroidery as low-cost solution for making wearable electronics

Embroidering power-generating yarns onto fabric has allowed researchers to embed a self-powered, numerical touch-pad and movement sensors into clothing. The technique offers a low-cost, scalable potential method for making ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

Technique prints flexible circuits on curved surfaces, from contact lenses to latex gloves

Researchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a new technique for directly printing electronic circuits onto curved and corrugated surfaces. The work paves the way for a variety of new soft electronic ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Apple prepares to get made-in-US chips in pivot from Asia

Apple Inc. is preparing to begin sourcing chips for its devices from a plant under construction in Arizona, marking a major step toward reducing the company's reliance on Asian production.

Electronics & Semiconductors

Preventing static in the semiconductor process

The research team led by Professor Ju-Hyuck Lee of the Department of Energy Science and Engineering at DGIST has developed a static prevention technology using a triboelectric nanogenerator. The findings of this study facilitate ...

Hardware

Using mushroom skin as a base for computer chips

A team of researchers at Johannes Kepler University has found that the skin of a certain kind of mushroom can be used as a biodegradable base for computer chips. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the ...