Security news

Energy & Green Tech

Cybercriminals are now targeting critical electricity infrastructure

Amid the constant stream of news on the coronavirus pandemic, one event passed relatively unnoticed. On the afternoon of May 14, a company named Elexon was hacked. You probably haven't heard of it, but Elexon plays a key ...

Security

Synthetic signatures and automatic autographs

One's signature, or autograph if one is famous, is a unique identifier for many people. It is used to sign documents from business contracts, cheques, a marriage license and everything in between. However, for those whose ...

Internet

Zoom CEO: No end-to-end encryption for free users so company can work with law enforcement

The CEO of popular video conferencing software Zoom said the company has no plans to offer end-to-end encryption to users of its free version so it can continue working with law enforcement.

Computer Sciences

Encrypting images with chaos

Research published in the International Journal of Information and Computer Security details a way to encode an image using a chaotic cryptosystem that makes it harder for someone to illicitly break the encryption by boosting ...

Security

Lockdown helps fuel rise in cybercrime

Take extra care before buying face masks or testing kits online, or responding to texts apparently sent to you by the UK government or the NHS. Because while lockdown has helped reduce the spread of the coronavirus, it is ...

Computer Sciences

Blockchain to the rescue of small publishers

As Australian book publishers grapple with global disruption, digital technologies, and economic uncertainty, QUT researchers are looking at how blockchain technology can help them survive and thrive.

Software

French virus tracing app goes live amid debate over privacy

France is rolling out an official coronavirus contact-tracing app aimed at containing fresh outbreaks as lockdown restrictions gradually ease, becoming the first major European country to deploy the smartphone technology ...

Internet

Report: Most Chrome security bugs rooted in faulty memory code

Google researchers have revealed that nearly three-quarters of all Chrome web browser security bugs stem from memory coding problems. They say their means of combatting memory management vulnerabilities through isolating ...