Security news

Security

Homomorphic encryption for cloud users

A new approach to encryption could improve user perception of cloud computing services where the users are concerned about private or personal data being exposed to third parties. Writing in the International Journal of Cloud ...

Security

UK police use of facial recognition tests public's tolerance

When British police used facial recognition cameras to monitor crowds arriving for a soccer match in Wales, some fans protested by covering their faces. In a sign of the technology's divisiveness, even the head of a neighboring ...

Internet

Who is taking and selling your personal data? Washington state lawmakers work to give people more of a say

Washington lawmakers are making another push to pass privacy regulations that govern companies' collection and sale of people's private digital information.

Software

NSA finds major security flaw in Windows 10, free fix issued

The National Security Agency has discovered a major security flaw in Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system that could allow hackers to intercept seemingly secure communications.

Security

Blockchain to trace agricultural supply chains

The impacts of unsustainable agriculture on the environment can be devastating. With increasing pressure from consumers for sustainably sourced products, companies need to act to minimise their impacts. But how can a company ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Privacy, once hidden topic, gets attention at CES tech show

Once a hidden and under-the-radar topic, privacy got more attention at the CES gadget show in Las Vegas this week. Startups now volunteer information about how they're securing your data and protecting your privacy when you ...

Security

Explainer: Not all cyber threats equally worrisome

West Virginia reported unusual cyber activity targeting its election systems. The Texas governor said the state was encountering attempted "attacks" at the rate of "about 10,000 per minute" from Iran. Information technology ...

Security

China facial-recognition case puts Big Brother on trial

Facial-recognition technology has become embedded in China, from airports to hotels, e-commerce sites and even public toilets, but a law professor had enough when asked to scan his face at a safari park.