arXiv

The arXiv (pronounced "archive", as if the "X" were the Greek letter Chi, χ) is an archive for electronic preprints of scientific papers in the fields of mathematics, physics, astronomy, computer science, quantitative biology, statistics, and quantitative finance which can be accessed online. In many fields of mathematics and physics, almost all scientific papers are self-archived on the arXiv. On 3 October 2008, arXiv.org passed the half-million article milestone. The preprint archive turned 20 years old on 14 August 2011. By 2012 the submission rate has grown to more than 6000 per month.

Publisher
Cornell University Library
Website
http://arxiv.org/
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Automotive

Advancing human-like perception in self-driving vehicles

How can mobile robots perceive and understand the environment correctly, even if parts of the environment are occluded by other objects? This is a key question that must be solved for self-driving vehicles to safely navigate ...

Computer Sciences

Vaccine attitudes detected in tweets by AI model

People's attitudes towards vaccines can now be detected from their social media posts by an intelligent AI model, developed by researchers at the University of Warwick.

Computer Sciences

A neural autoencoder to enhance sensory neuroprostheses

New technologies have the potential to greatly simplify the lives of humans, including those of blind individuals. One of the most promising types of tools designed to assist the blind are visual prostheses.

Robotics

Using Rubik's cube to improve and evaluate robot manipulation

Researchers at University of Washington have recently developed a new protocol to train robots and test their performance on tasks that involve object manipulation. This protocol, presented in a paper published in IEEE Robotics ...

Machine learning & AI

Demystifying machine-learning systems using natural language

Neural networks are sometimes called black boxes because, despite the fact that they can outperform humans on certain tasks, even the researchers who design them often don't understand how or why they work so well. But if ...

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