Nature Communications

Nature Communications is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Nature Publishing Group since 2010. The editor in chief is Lesley Anson. It is multidisciplinary in scope, with coverage that includes all topics in physics, chemistry, and biology. The online-only journal is specifically designed to fill in gaps for research articles where there is no dedicated journal available in the Nature Publishing Group journals. For example coverage of this journal includes developmental biology, plant sciences, microbiology, ecology and evolution, palaeontology and astronomy. Cross-disciplinary research such as biophysics, bioengineering, chemical physics and environmental science, are also published. However, all cross-disciplinary works are considered for publication.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
United Kingdom
History
2010-present
Website
https://www.nature.com/ncomms/index.html
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Engineering

Researchers use ultrasound waves to move objects hands-free

University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers have discovered a new method to move objects using ultrasound waves. The research opens the door for using contactless manipulation in industries such as manufacturing and robotics, ...

Hardware

Energy-efficient computing with tiny magnetic vortices

A large percentage of energy used today is consumed in the form of electrical power for processing and storing data and for running the relevant terminal equipment and devices. According to predictions, the level of energy ...

Energy & Green Tech

Ultra-sensitive optical sensor can reduce hydrogen's risks

In the pursuit of clean and renewable energy, hydrogen plays an important role. But a major challenge facing this transition is that the gas is explosive when mixed with air. For this reason, it is crucial to be able to detect ...

Engineering

Breaking the scaling limits of analog computing

As machine-learning models become larger and more complex, they require faster and more energy-efficient hardware to perform computations. Conventional digital computers are struggling to keep up.

Robotics

Self-organization: What robotics can learn from amoebae

Amoebae are single-cell organisms. By means of self-organization, they can form complex structures—and do this purely through local interactions: If they have a lot of food, they disperse evenly through a culture medium. ...

page 1 from 5