Nature

Nature, first published on 4 November 1869, is ranked the world s most cited interdisciplinary scientific journal by the Science Edition of the 2010 Journal Citation Reports. Most scientific journals are now highly specialized, and Nature is among the few journals (the other weekly journals Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are also prominent examples) that still publish original research articles across a wide range of scientific fields. There are many fields of scientific research in which important new advances and original research are published as either articles or letters in Nature. Research scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles are intended to make many of the most important papers understandable to scientists in other fields and the educated general public. Towards the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
United Kingdom
History
1869-present
Website
http://www.nature.com/nature/index.html
Impact factor
36.101 (2010)
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Engineering

Engineers develop new kind of 3D printing

While 3D printing techniques have advanced significantly in the last decade, the technology continues to face a fundamental limitation: objects must be built up layer by layer. But what if they didn't have to be?

Energy & Green Tech

Next-generation solar cells reach 24% efficiency

A German research team has developed a tandem solar cell that reaches 24 percent efficiency—measured according to the fraction of photons converted into electricity (i.e., electrons). This sets a new world record as the ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

Engineered crystals could help computers run on less power

Computers may be growing smaller and more powerful, but they require a great deal of energy to operate. The total amount of energy the U.S. dedicates to computing has risen dramatically over the last decade and is quickly ...

Engineering

A stretchy display for shapable electronics

No one would ever imagine crumpling up their smartphone, television or another electronic device. Today's displays—which are flat, rigid and fragile—lack the ability to reshape to interactively respond to users.

Machine learning & AI

Mathematical paradoxes demonstrate the limits of AI

Humans are usually pretty good at recognizing when they get things wrong, but artificial intelligence systems are not. According to a new study, AI generally suffers from inherent limitations due to a century-old mathematical ...

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