Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) was founded in 2000 by biomedical scientists Harold E. Varmus, Patrick O. Brown and Michael Eisen for the purpose of granting open access to the public about scientific research papers. An open letter was sent to scientific publishers encouraging them to all distribution of their research literature through an on-line publication like the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central. In response to a less than receptive response, PLOS launched a nonprofit scientific and medical publishing venture in 2003. PLOS articles are available free on-line and appear immediately on the web site for no charge. PLOS received start-up funds from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundations and has received various other foundation endowments for their not for profit enterprise.

Address
185 Berry Street, Suite 3100 San Francisco, CA 94107 USA
E-mail
press@plos.org
Website
http://www.plos.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Library_of_Science
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Engineering

Mapping urban greenspace use with cellphone GPS data

GPS data from cell phones may provide insight into how city inhabitants are using their urban greenspaces, in a study published July 7, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Meghann Mears and Paul Brindley from the ...

Internet

A novel strategy for quickly identifying twitter trolls

Two algorithms that account for distinctive use of repeated words and word pairs require as few as 50 tweets to accurately distinguish deceptive "troll" messages from those posted by public figures. Sergei Monakhov of Friedrich ...

Machine learning & AI

Tracking urban gentrification, one building at a time

A new deep-mapping computer model can detect visual changes to individual properties, allowing researchers to more-rapidly track gentrification within neighborhoods and cities, according to a study published March 13, 2019 ...

Robotics

Robat uses sound to navigate and map a novel environment

A fully autonomous bat-like terrestrial robot, named Robat, can use echolocation to move through a novel environment while mapping it solely based on sound, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by ...