Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) was founded in 2000 by biomedical scientists Harold E. Varmus, Patrick O. Brown and Michael Eisen for the purpose of granting open access to the public about scientific research papers. An open letter was sent to scientific publishers encouraging them to all distribution of their research literature through an on-line publication like the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central. In response to a less than receptive response, PLOS launched a nonprofit scientific and medical publishing venture in 2003. PLOS articles are available free on-line and appear immediately on the web site for no charge. PLOS received start-up funds from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundations and has received various other foundation endowments for their not for profit enterprise.

Address
185 Berry Street, Suite 3100 San Francisco, CA 94107 USA
E-mail
press@plos.org
Website
http://www.plos.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_Library_of_Science
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Quantum Physics

Adding or subtracting single quanta of sound

Researchers perform experiments that can add or subtract a single quantum of sound—with surprising results when applied to noisy sound fields.

Medical research

Researchers develop promising way to find new cancer drugs

All the cells in the human body share the same genes. But how our genes are expressed determines whether a cell becomes a brain cell or a liver cell. In addition, changes in gene expression often play a significant role in ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Musicians have more connected brains than non-musicians

The brains of musicians have stronger structural and functional connections compared to those of non-musicians, regardless of innate pitch ability, according to new research from JNeurosci.

Oncology & Cancer

Disparities in lung cancer screening eligibility still exist

(HealthDay)—Despite increases in lung cancer screening eligibility, gender, racial, and ethnic screening disparities may still persist, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in JAMA Network Open.