University of South Australia

The University of South Australia (UniSA) is a public university in the Australian state of South Australia. It was formed in 1991 with the merger of the South Australian Institute of Technology and Colleges of Advanced Education. It is the largest university in South Australia, with more than 36,000 students. About 14,000 students are international, with half studying in Adelaide and the remainder offshore. The University is a founding member of the Australian Technology Network of universities. It has four metropolitan campuses in Adelaide and two regional campuses in Whyalla and Mount Gambier. The University of South Australia was formed in 1991 with the merger of the South Australian Institute of Technology (SAIT) with three of the campuses (Magill, Salisbury and Underdale) of the South Australian College of Advanced Education (SACAE). The two other SACAE campuses, City and Sturt, were merged with the University of Adelaide and Flinders University respectively. To the former SACAE campuses of Magill, Salisbury and Underdale, SAIT added to the merger its three campuses at City East, The Levels (now known as Mawson Lakes) and Whyalla.

Address
160 Currie St., Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Website
http://www.unisa.edu.au
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_South_Australia
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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