Business

Still on top: Cyber Monday sales on track to hit record

Cyber Monday is still holding up as the biggest online shopping day of the year, even though many of the same deals have been available online for weeks and the name harks back to the days of dial-up modems.

Business

US online Black Friday sales hit record $7.4 bn

Online sales on Black Friday in the United States hit a record $7.4 billion this year, with a jump in the number of transactions made from smartphones, according to data released Saturday by Adobe Analytics.

Security

VeryMal: Campaign in image-based malware spotted

By this time, news stories have made words like bugs, viruses and malware familiar and by all means frequent, as computer users scramble to self-educate on how to avoid falling victim to a range of security invasions.

Computer Sciences

Photo fakery nabbed via outsmarting techniques

Adobe Research has been getting busy nailing down how to spot image manipulations by unleashing AI on the case. In doing so, they may be achieving real headway in the field of image forensics.

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Adobe

Adobe ( /əˈdoʊbi/, UK /əˈdoʊb/; Arabic: الطوبة) is a natural building material made from sand, clay, water, and some kind of fibrous or organic material (sticks, straw, and/or manure), which the builders shape into bricks using frames and dry in the sun. Adobe buildings are similar to cob and mudbrick buildings. Adobe structures are extremely durable, and account for some of the oldest existing buildings in the world. In hot climates, compared with wooden buildings, adobe buildings offer significant advantages due to their greater thermal mass, but they are known to be particularly susceptible to earthquake damage.

Buildings made of sun-dried earth are common in the West Asia, North Africa, West Africa, South America, southwestern North America, Spain (usually in the Mudéjar style), Eastern Europe and East Anglia, particularly Norfolk, known as 'clay lump. Adobe had been in use by indigenous peoples of the Americas in the Southwestern United States, Mesoamerica, and the Andean region of South America for several thousand years, although often substantial amounts of stone are used in the walls of Pueblo buildings. (Also, the Pueblo people built their adobe structures with handfuls or basketfuls of adobe, until the Spanish introduced them to the making of bricks.) Adobe brickmaking was used in Spain already in the Late Bronze Age and Iron Age, from the eighth century B.C. on. Its wide use can be attributed to its simplicity of design and make, and the economy of creating it.

A distinction is sometimes made between the smaller adobes, which are about the size of ordinary baked bricks, and the larger adobines, some of which may be one to two yards (1-2 m) long.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA