Consumer & Gadgets

RFID tag arrays track body movements, shape changes

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have found ways to track body movements and detect shape changes using arrays of RFID tags. RFID-embedded clothing thus could be used to control avatars in video games—much like in ...

Telecom

Tiny antennas show promise in defense sector

Electrical engineering research into extremely small antennas has made progress that could have a major impact on secure information exchange, giving the U.S. access to a band of frequency no other country can reach.

Engineering

How a drone can soar without using GPS

Drones use GPS to find their way without a pilot. But GPS signals can be easily blocked by tall skyscrapers or trees—leaving drones lost.

Engineering

New membrane-based antenna much smaller than conventional ones

A group led by researchers at Northeastern University in the U.S. has developed a new kind of antenna that is much smaller than conventional antennas. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the team ...

Hi Tech & Innovation

Patent talk: Wireless charging using Wi-Fi routers

(Tech Xplore)—We all like hearing about suggestions on how we could cut the time-outs and cords and forget about the docks to keep our phones running. What about having in hand a method where you can charge an iPhone wirelessly ...

Engineers design next-generation non-reciprocal antenna

Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have designed an antenna that is able to process incoming and outgoing radio-wave signals more efficiently and without the need for separate ...

Engineering

Antenna-minded Mitsubishi turns to seawater for conductive plume

Mitsubishi Electric, in the business of selling electrical and electronic equipment used in industries ranging from satellite communications, to energy and building equipment, is interested in coming up with innovative ways ...

page 1 from 2