Engineering

Does traffic noise from flying cars cause stress?

Researchers from Nagoya University and Keio University in Japan have estimated a person's stress levels caused by the sound of a flying car passing overhead. The research was published in the Technical Journal of Advanced ...

Machine learning & AI

Advancing dynamic brain imaging with AI

MRI, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography have long served as the tools to study brain activity, but new research from Carnegie Mellon University introduces a novel, AI-based dynamic brain imaging technology ...

Electronics & Semiconductors

Demonstrating significant energy savings using neuromorphic hardware

For the first time TU Graz's Institute of Theoretical Computer Science and Intel Labs demonstrated experimentally that a large neural network can process sequences such as sentences while consuming four to sixteen times less ...

Computer Sciences

New brain-painting method being tested for ADHD treatment

Imagine focusing on one thing so well that you can control its movement. Now, imagine mentally selecting colors and shapes to create an abstract image—a brain painting. USF computer scientist Marvin Andujar is harnessing ...

Computer Sciences

A flexible Bayesian framework for unbiased estimation of timescales

An international team of researchers from Tübingen and Cold Spring Harbor (New York) has found a pioneering way of determining at what pace changes typically happen. The new method avoids previous systematic errors in estimating ...

Robotics

Mind-controlled robots now one step closer

Tetraplegic patients are prisoners of their own bodies, unable to speak or perform the slightest movement. Researchers have been working for years to develop systems that can help these patients carry out some tasks on their ...

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Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma and encephalopathies. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques such as MRI and CT.

Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research.

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