Engineering

How fire causes office-building floors to collapse

Engineers and technicians at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) spent months meticulously recreating the long concrete floors supported by steel beams commonly found in high-rise office buildings, only ...

Internet

The battle against disinformation is global

Disinformation-spewing online bots and trolls from halfway around the world are continuing to shape local and national debates by spreading lies online on a massive scale. In 2019, Russia used Facebook to intervene in the ...

Software

Simulating the stars at exascale requires HIP solutions

As GPU architectures have become the standard for scientific computing, application teams have had to retrofit their scientific codes to run on new systems. Even teams with codes that have been re-engineered for GPUs must ...

Consumer & Gadgets

From exoskeletons to education at CES

Exoskeletons to give wearers super-human strength and games to playfully teach children software skills for coding—such innovations were on display at the Consumer Electronics Show this week.

Internet

Copyright probe, raids stoke fear in Russian IT

Russia's tech community has expressed alarm over raids on web company Nginx, one of the country's biggest IT success stories, in a copyright probe that its co-founder condemned on Monday as "racketeering".

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Code

A code is a rule for converting a piece of information (for example, a letter, word, phrase, or gesture) into another form or representation (one sign into another sign), not necessarily of the same type.

In communications and information processing, encoding is the process by which information from a source is converted into symbols to be communicated. Decoding is the reverse process, converting these code symbols back into information understandable by a receiver.

One reason for coding is to enable communication in places where ordinary spoken or written language is difficult or impossible. For example, semaphore, where the configuration of flags held signaller or the arms of a semaphore tower encodes parts of the message, typically individual letters and numbers. Another person standing a great distance away can interpret the flags and reproduce the words sent.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA