Consumer & Gadgets

Learning system for visually impaired features coding by using hands

Visually impaired children who would love to learn how to code? Here's looking at you, says Microsoft. Its approach toward teaching with a physical programming language has taken bigger steps since its beginnings four years ...

Computer Sciences

SapFix cutting cool path toward eliminating debugging-code drudgery

Facebook has come up with something called SapFix and their announcement signifies a welcome measure of support for debugging task drudgery; SapFix can rely on artificial intelligence and come up with some answers that save ...

Security

Using machine learning to detect software vulnerabilities

A team of researchers from R&D company Draper and Boston University developed a new large-scale vulnerability detection system using machine learning algorithms, which could help to discover software vulnerabilities faster ...

Computer Sciences

Team turns deep-learning AI loose on software development

Computer scientists at Rice University have created a deep-learning, software-coding application that can help human programmers navigate the growing multitude of often-undocumented application programming interfaces, or ...

Software

JavaScript for beginners: Grasshopper can teach coding

If you are new at coding and don't want to rearrange your life as a result—changing work hours, spending wads on formal courses—you may want to know about Grasshopper, a new way you can learn to write code on your phone.

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Code

A code is a rule for converting a piece of information (for example, a letter, word, phrase, or gesture) into another form or representation (one sign into another sign), not necessarily of the same type.

In communications and information processing, encoding is the process by which information from a source is converted into symbols to be communicated. Decoding is the reverse process, converting these code symbols back into information understandable by a receiver.

One reason for coding is to enable communication in places where ordinary spoken or written language is difficult or impossible. For example, semaphore, where the configuration of flags held signaller or the arms of a semaphore tower encodes parts of the message, typically individual letters and numbers. Another person standing a great distance away can interpret the flags and reproduce the words sent.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA