Internet

Credit card skimmers hide in web page image files

A particularly nasty form of consumer credit card theft centers on the use of skimming devices embedded in credit card machines at locations such as gas stations and convenience stores. As a customer swipes a card, the hidden ...

Internet

TikTok joins EU code of conduct on disinformation

The social media phenomenon TikTok joined the EU's disinformation code of conduct on Monday as tech giants seek to persuade Europe to back away from setting laws against harmful content online.

Internet

TikTok joins EU code of conduct on hate speech

The social media phenomenon TikTok joined the EU's code of conduct on Monday as tech giants seek to persuade Europe to back away from setting laws against hate speech and disinformation.

Computer Sciences

Blockchain to the rescue of small publishers

As Australian book publishers grapple with global disruption, digital technologies, and economic uncertainty, QUT researchers are looking at how blockchain technology can help them survive and thrive.

Internet

Report: Most Chrome security bugs rooted in faulty memory code

Google researchers have revealed that nearly three-quarters of all Chrome web browser security bugs stem from memory coding problems. They say their means of combatting memory management vulnerabilities through isolating ...

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Code

A code is a rule for converting a piece of information (for example, a letter, word, phrase, or gesture) into another form or representation (one sign into another sign), not necessarily of the same type.

In communications and information processing, encoding is the process by which information from a source is converted into symbols to be communicated. Decoding is the reverse process, converting these code symbols back into information understandable by a receiver.

One reason for coding is to enable communication in places where ordinary spoken or written language is difficult or impossible. For example, semaphore, where the configuration of flags held signaller or the arms of a semaphore tower encodes parts of the message, typically individual letters and numbers. Another person standing a great distance away can interpret the flags and reproduce the words sent.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA