Computer Sciences

A deep learning technique to generate DNS amplification attacks

Deep learning techniques have recently proved to be highly promising for detecting cybersecurity attacks and determining their nature. Concurrently, many cybercriminals have been devising new attacks aimed at interfering ...

Computer Sciences

NIST announces first four quantum-resistant cryptographic algorithms

The U.S. Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has chosen the first group of encryption tools that are designed to withstand the assault of a future quantum computer, which could potentially ...

Security

Learning to combat DDOS attacks

Denial of service (DOS) and distributed denial of service (DDOS) attacks on computer systems are a major concern to those charged with keeping online services running and protecting systems and those who use them. Such intrusions ...

Computer Sciences

Sensor imperfections are perfect for forensic camera analysis

In a project aimed at developing intelligent tools to fight child exploitation, University of Groningen computer scientists have developed a system to analyze the noise produced by individual cameras. This information can ...

Energy & Green Tech

New model finds best sites for electric vehicle charging stations

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a computational model that can be used to determine the optimal places for locating electric vehicle (EV) charging facilities, as well as how powerful the charging ...

Security

Costa Rica public health system targeted by ransomware

Another attempted hacking of a Costa Rican government agency's computer system led the country's public health agency to shut down its systems Tuesday to protect itself, complicating the medical care of thousands of people.

page 1 from 15

Computer

A computer is a machine that manipulates data according to a set of instructions.

Although mechanical examples of computers have existed through much of recorded human history, the first electronic computers were developed in the mid-20th century (1940–1945). These were the size of a large room, consuming as much power as several hundred modern personal computers (PCs). Modern computers based on integrated circuits are millions to billions of times more capable than the early machines, and occupy a fraction of the space. Simple computers are small enough to fit into a wristwatch, and can be powered by a watch battery. Personal computers in their various forms are icons of the Information Age and are what most people think of as "computers". The embedded computers found in many devices from MP3 players to fighter aircraft and from toys to industrial robots are however the most numerous.

The ability to store and execute lists of instructions called programs makes computers extremely versatile, distinguishing them from calculators. The Church–Turing thesis is a mathematical statement of this versatility: any computer with a certain minimum capability is, in principle, capable of performing the same tasks that any other computer can perform. Therefore computers ranging from a mobile phone to a supercomputer are all able to perform the same computational tasks, given enough time and storage capacity.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA