Automotive

Teaching cars to drive with foresight

Good drivers anticipate dangerous situations and adjust their driving before things get dicey. Researchers at the University of Bonn now also want to teach this skill to self-driving cars. They will present a corresponding ...

Software

Tapis computing platform weaves together science computing tools

Scientists looking to reduce their complexity to research and add a new computational tool to their tool belt can explore the Tapis Project. The Tapis software platform aims to help researchers more easily leverage powerful ...

Internet

Detecting malicious web pages

There is a lot of malware on the internet, unwitting computer users might be enticed to visit web pages serving such malicious content and as such there is a pressing need to develop security systems that can quickly detect ...

Other

Ethical algorithms

Nearly forty thousand people lost their lives in car crashes last year in the U.S. alone. We can only presume that many of those fatalities were owed to our uniquely human frailties: distracted driving, driving under the ...

Engineering

Engineering team develops 'shipyard on a ship'

After months of product development, University of Nebraska–Lincoln engineers are leaving safe harbor to test their prototype on the open ocean.

Engineering

Artificial intelligence opens new window on complex urban issues

Understanding the workings and behaviors of a city requires knowledge of the different processes that allow people and other biological organisms to live and thrive, as well as understanding of their interrelationships—many ...

Security

Payouts from insurance policies may fuel ransomware attacks

The call came on a Saturday in July delivering grim news: Many of the computer systems serving the government of LaPorte County, Indiana, had been taken hostage with ransomware. The hackers demanded $250,000.

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Computer

A computer is a machine that manipulates data according to a set of instructions.

Although mechanical examples of computers have existed through much of recorded human history, the first electronic computers were developed in the mid-20th century (1940–1945). These were the size of a large room, consuming as much power as several hundred modern personal computers (PCs). Modern computers based on integrated circuits are millions to billions of times more capable than the early machines, and occupy a fraction of the space. Simple computers are small enough to fit into a wristwatch, and can be powered by a watch battery. Personal computers in their various forms are icons of the Information Age and are what most people think of as "computers". The embedded computers found in many devices from MP3 players to fighter aircraft and from toys to industrial robots are however the most numerous.

The ability to store and execute lists of instructions called programs makes computers extremely versatile, distinguishing them from calculators. The Church–Turing thesis is a mathematical statement of this versatility: any computer with a certain minimum capability is, in principle, capable of performing the same tasks that any other computer can perform. Therefore computers ranging from a mobile phone to a supercomputer are all able to perform the same computational tasks, given enough time and storage capacity.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA