Machine learning & AI

Opening the 'black box' of artificial intelligence

Artificial intelligence is growing ever more powerful and entering people's daily lives, yet often we don't know what goes on inside these systems. Their non-transparency could fuel practical problems, or even racism, which ...

Business

US military sticks with Microsoft for $10 bn cloud contract

The US Department of Defense said Friday it is sticking with its decision to award a $10 billion cloud computing contract to Microsoft, despite Amazon's claims that President Donald Trump improperly influenced the process.

Automotive

Volkswagen loses top EU court case in diesel scandal

The European Union's top court ruled on Thursday that Volkswagen breached the law by installing on its cars a so-called defeat device to cheat on emission tests and cannot argue it was merely protecting car engines.

Business

EU, US make new attempt for data privacy deal

Europe and the United States will use a thaw in ties to strike a pact that would allow for the exchange of private data across the Atlantic, replacing previous agreements struck down by an EU court.

Automotive

VW 'dieselgate' fraud: Timeline of a scandal

As Volkswagen faces the wrath of car owners in a mass "dieselgate" lawsuit on its home turf, here's a look at how emissions cheating was uncovered and the fallout for the auto giant:

Business

Canada top court clears way for Uber drivers class action

The Supreme Court of Canada cleared the way for a Can$400 million (US$300 million) class action lawsuit to force Uber to recognize drivers as employees, while ruling Friday its arbitration scheme void.

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Court

A court is a body, often a governmental institution, with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes and dispense civil, criminal, or administrative justice in accordance with rules of law. In common law and civil law states, courts are the central means for dispute resolution, and it is generally understood that all persons have an ability to bring their claims before a court. Similarly, those accused of a crime have the right to present their defense before a court.

Court facilities range from a simple farmhouse for a village court in a rural community to huge buildings housing dozens of courtrooms in large cities.

A court is a kind of deliberative assembly with special powers, called its jurisdiction, or jus dicere, to decide certain kinds of questions or petitions put to it. According to William Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England, a court is constituted by a minimum of three parties, namely, the actor, reus, and judex, though, often, courts consist of additional attorneys, bailiffs, reporters, and perhaps a jury.

The term "court" is often used to refer to the president of the court, also known as the "judge" or the "bench", or the panel of such officials. For example, in the United States, and other common law jurisdictions, the term "court" (in the case of U.S. federal courts) by law is used to describe the judge himself or herself.

In the United States, the legal authority of a court to take action is based on three pillars of power over the parties to the litigation: (1) Personal jurisdiction; (2) Subject matter jurisdiction; and (3) Venue.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA