Automotive

Startup Kelekona develops a 40-seat drone bus

Inspired by the packed to the brim trains from New Jersey to New York, Braeden Kelekona came up with the idea for a 40-seat drone bus. This concept would aim to keep passenger numbers reasonable in order to accommodate desired ...

Energy & Green Tech

Energy Secretary says US wants 'responsible' lithium mining

Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm said the Biden administration wants to see lithium needed for electric cars to be mined "in a responsible way" that respects the environment and Native American tribes.

Energy & Green Tech

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells

An electrode coating just one molecule thick can significantly enhance the performance of an organic photovoltaic cell, KAUST researchers have found. The coating outperforms the leading material currently used for this task ...

Automotive

Eying deal, GM softens on tough standards for car pollution

The nation's largest automaker said Wednesday it can support greenhouse gas emissions limits that other car manufacturers negotiated with California—if they are achieved mostly by promoting sales of fully electric vehicles.

Automotive

Renault charged with 'deceit' in diesel emissions inquiry

French carmaker Renault said Tuesday that it had been charged by prosecutors over claims it cheated on emission tests for diesel vehicles for several years, a scandal that has rocked rivals across the industry.

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Electricity

Electricity (from the New Latin ēlectricus, "amber-like"[a]) is a general term that encompasses a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. These include many easily recognizable phenomena, such as lightning and static electricity, but in addition, less familiar concepts, such as the electromagnetic field and electromagnetic induction.

In general usage, the word 'electricity' is adequate to refer to a number of physical effects. However, in scientific usage, the term is vague, and these related, but distinct, concepts are better identified by more precise terms:

Electrical phenomena have been studied since antiquity, though advances in the science were not made until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Practical applications for electricity however remained few, and it would not be until the late nineteenth century that engineers were able to put it to industrial and residential use. The rapid expansion in electrical technology at this time transformed industry and society. Electricity's extraordinary versatility as a source of energy means it can be put to an almost limitless set of applications which include transport, heating, lighting, communications, and computation. The backbone of modern industrial society is, and for the foreseeable future can be expected to remain, the use of electrical power.

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