Building construction starts at Ford site in Tennessee

Building construction has begun at the future site of a factory where Ford and a South Korean company have joined forces to build electric trucks and batteries in rural west Tennessee, officials said Friday.

Robotics

Soft robots that grip with the right amount of force

Tool use has long been a hallmark of human intelligence, as well as a practical problem to solve for a vast array of robotic applications. But machines are still wonky at exerting just the right amount of force to control ...

Energy & Green Tech

Toward a European carbon footprint rule for batteries

Top energy, tech, and climate researchers at ETH Zurich have engaged in an informed debate over the European regulation that sets an upper carbon footprint limit for European markets.

Electronics & Semiconductors

Reduced power consumption in semiconductor devices

Stepping stones are placed to help travelers to cross streams. As long as there are stepping stones that connect both sides of the water, one can easily get across with just a few steps. Using the same principle, a research ...

Energy & Green Tech

Batteries, community spirit help California fight heat wave

Dire predictions of blackouts in California during a fearsome heat wave this month never came to pass, with technology—and a dose of community spirit—helping the creaking grid through its most testing period ever.

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Electricity

Electricity (from the New Latin ēlectricus, "amber-like"[a]) is a general term that encompasses a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. These include many easily recognizable phenomena, such as lightning and static electricity, but in addition, less familiar concepts, such as the electromagnetic field and electromagnetic induction.

In general usage, the word 'electricity' is adequate to refer to a number of physical effects. However, in scientific usage, the term is vague, and these related, but distinct, concepts are better identified by more precise terms:

Electrical phenomena have been studied since antiquity, though advances in the science were not made until the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Practical applications for electricity however remained few, and it would not be until the late nineteenth century that engineers were able to put it to industrial and residential use. The rapid expansion in electrical technology at this time transformed industry and society. Electricity's extraordinary versatility as a source of energy means it can be put to an almost limitless set of applications which include transport, heating, lighting, communications, and computation. The backbone of modern industrial society is, and for the foreseeable future can be expected to remain, the use of electrical power.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA