Machine learning & AI

Scientists teach AI to predict bankruptcy

The ability to accurately assess the financial risks of dealing with a business is vital to both the economy and society. This is particularly true when forecasting bankruptcy, which can result in significant financial losses ...

Machine learning & AI

AI weather forecasting for smart farms

Researchers working on smart irrigation systems have developed a way to choose the most accurate weather forecast out of those offered in the week leading up to a given day.

Automotive

GM lifts forecast as chip shortage eases, stock hits record

Shares of General Motors Co. closed at a record high Thursday after the company said its efforts to manage the global computer chip shortage have worked better than expected, so it's financial results will improve.

Computer Sciences

A neural network improves forecasts for severe storm hazards

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is using artificial intelligence to run experimental forecasts for hail, tornadoes, and intense winds—storm hazards that can cause serious damage but that are notoriously ...

Business

Airlines face another bleak year as outlook worsens

Airlines face another bleak year with steeper losses than previously forecast, as some regions struggle to speed up COVID-19 vaccination campaigns and control virus variants, an industry group said Wednesday.

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Forecastle

Forecastle refers to the upper deck of a sailing ship forward of the foremast, or the forward part of a ship with the sailors' living quarters. Related to the latter meaning is the phrase "before the mast" which denotes anything related to ordinary sailors, as opposed to a ship's officers.

In medieval shipbuilding, a ship of war was usually equipped with a tall, multi-deck castle-like structure in the bow of the ship. It served as a platform for archers to shoot down on enemy ships, or as a defensive stronghold if the ship were boarded. A similar but usually much larger structure, called the aftcastle, was at the aft end of the ship, often stretching all the way from the main mast to the stern.

Having such tall upper works on the ship was detrimental to sailing performance. As cannons were introduced and gunfire replaced boarding as the primary means of naval combat during the 16th century, the medieval forecastle was no longer needed, and later ships such as the galleon had only a low, one-deck high forecastle.

In addition to crew's quarters, the forecastle may contain essential machinery such as the anchor windlass. On many modern US Naval ships, such as aircraft carriers, the forecastle is the location where boatswain will display their fancy knotwork such as coxcombing.

Some sailing ships and many modern non-sail ships have no forecastle as such at all but the name is still used to indicate the foremost part of the upper deck – although often called the foredeck – and for any crews quarters in the bow of the ship, even if below the main deck.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA