Energy & Green Tech

Colorful solar panels could make the technology more attractive

Solar panels aren't just for rooftops anymore—some buildings even have these power-generating structures all over their facades. But as more buildings and public spaces incorporate photovoltaic technologies, their monotonous ...

Engineering

Integrating metal microstructures in glass

Safe from harsh environmental conditions, electrically and thermally conductive, and with great lithographic resolution: Embedding thin metal microstructures in glass promises exceptional properties for a range of applications. ...

Engineering

Using AI to predict when and where glass will break

The ability to predict when materials will fracture is of immense importance for industrial applications—companies can use this information to maintain devices and components more efficiently and cost effectively. A research ...

Robotics

Training a robot to recognize and pour water

A horse, a zebra and artificial intelligence helped a team of Carnegie Mellon University researchers teach a robot to recognize water and pour it into a glass.

Energy & Green Tech

Creating ultralight flexible perovskite solar cells

In a recently-published study, 3-µm-thick commercially available parylene-C was deposited on the top of pre-cleaned glass via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and then the flip-over transferring (FOT) process was employed ...

Business

Meta opens first physical store

Facebook parent Meta has opened its first physical store—in Burlingame, California—to showcase its hardware products like virtual and augmented reality goggles and glasses.

Engineering

Recycled glass waste used as sand replacement in 3D printing

Researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed the capability to use recycled glass in 3D printing, opening doors to a more environmentally sustainable way of building and construction.

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Glass

Glass generally refers to hard, brittle, transparent material, such as those used for windows, many bottles, or eyewear. Examples of such solid materials include, but are not limited to, soda-lime glass, borosilicate glass, acrylic glass, sugar glass, isinglass (Muscovy-glass), or aluminium oxynitride. In the technical sense, glass is an inorganic product of fusion which has been cooled through the glass transition to a rigid condition without crystallizing. Many glasses contain silica as their main component and glass former.

In the scientific sense the term glass is often extended to all amorphous solids (and melts that easily form amorphous solids), including plastics, resins, or other silica-free amorphous solids. In addition, besides traditional melting techniques, any other means of preparation are considered, such as ion implantation, and the sol-gel method. However, glass science and physics commonly includes only inorganic amorphous solids, while plastics and similar organics are covered by polymer science, biology and further scientific disciplines.

Glass plays an essential role in science and industry. The optical and physical properties of glass make it suitable for applications such as flat glass, container glass, optics and optoelectronics material, laboratory equipment, thermal insulator (glass wool), reinforcement fiber (glass-reinforced plastic, glass fiber reinforced concrete), and art.

The term glass developed in the late Roman Empire. It was in the Roman glassmaking center at Trier, Germany, that the late-Latin term glesum originated, probably from a Germanic word for a transparent, lustrous substance.

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