Consumer & Gadgets

2020: A look back at the decade in tech from Alexa to Xbox

"Alexa" was just another female name. Uber hadn't taken anyone for a ride yet. And the buzz around Facebook had more to do with the fact that seemingly everyone you once knew was turning up on "The Social Network," and less ...

Hi Tech & Innovation

Patent talk: Transition lenses in broad daylight for AR

Will they or won't they? Headlines surface regularly that this, that or the other among digital brands are going to come out with a killer pair of augmented reality glasses, and it's hope, too, mixed with anticipation, feeding ...

Engineering

Team develops bimodal 'electronic skin'

Through the crafty use of magnetic fields, scientists from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and the Johannes Kepler University in Linz have developed the first electronic sensor that can simultaneously process ...

Engineering

One person's waste glass becomes another person's treasure

In a bid to preserve the world's second most used natural resource—sand—University of Queensland Ph.D. candidate Danish Kazmi has developed a sustainable solution that could reduce its use in the construction industry.

Security

Tape, glasses allow researchers to bypass Face ID

In September 2018, a tech watcher was admirably candid: If you are a normal person, Apple FaceID is basically safe, she said. But then this tech watcher, Rachel Kraus, wrote in Mashable that "as I sized up the arguments for ...

Engineering

Smart glasses follow our eyes, focus automatically

Though it may not have the sting of death and taxes, presbyopia is another of life's guarantees. This vision defect plagues most of us starting about age 45, as the lenses in our eyes lose the elasticity needed to focus on ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Google Glass struck out for masses but enterprise class has takers

My, have we grown. All eyes are on the Glass Enterprise Edition 2. with its hardware update and new frames. Google Glass has come a long way since its debut in 2013. As Scott Stein in CNET quipped, "You might remember Glass ...

Engineering

Researchers use 3-D printer to print glass

For the first time, researchers have successfully 3-D printed chalcogenide glass, a unique material used to make optical components that operate at mid-infrared wavelengths. The ability to 3-D print this glass could make ...

Consumer & Gadgets

Drops and poundings don't bother tough Samsung Display panel

Samsung Display would not be bothered if you pound away at this panel, and go ahead, drop it till the cows come home, because they are rather confident about their new claim. They have come up with an unbreakable panel for ...

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Glass

Glass generally refers to hard, brittle, transparent material, such as those used for windows, many bottles, or eyewear. Examples of such solid materials include, but are not limited to, soda-lime glass, borosilicate glass, acrylic glass, sugar glass, isinglass (Muscovy-glass), or aluminium oxynitride. In the technical sense, glass is an inorganic product of fusion which has been cooled through the glass transition to a rigid condition without crystallizing. Many glasses contain silica as their main component and glass former.

In the scientific sense the term glass is often extended to all amorphous solids (and melts that easily form amorphous solids), including plastics, resins, or other silica-free amorphous solids. In addition, besides traditional melting techniques, any other means of preparation are considered, such as ion implantation, and the sol-gel method. However, glass science and physics commonly includes only inorganic amorphous solids, while plastics and similar organics are covered by polymer science, biology and further scientific disciplines.

Glass plays an essential role in science and industry. The optical and physical properties of glass make it suitable for applications such as flat glass, container glass, optics and optoelectronics material, laboratory equipment, thermal insulator (glass wool), reinforcement fiber (glass-reinforced plastic, glass fiber reinforced concrete), and art.

The term glass developed in the late Roman Empire. It was in the Roman glassmaking center at Trier, Germany, that the late-Latin term glesum originated, probably from a Germanic word for a transparent, lustrous substance.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA