Energy & Green Tech

Want to save carbon and land? Study suggests wooden cities

Housing people in homes made from wood instead of steel and concrete could save more than 100 billion metric tons of carbon emissions while preserving enough cropland to feed a booming population, research suggested Tuesday.

Automotive

Lamborghini has already sold all its cars until 2024

Italian sports car maker Lamborghini has already pre-sold the entire production run to early 2024, its boss told AFP on Tuesday, with luxury goods seemingly unaffected by global economic uncertainty.

Business

Chipmakers' pandemic boom turns to bust as recession looms

Even in an industry famous for its rollercoaster cycles, chipmakers are bracing for a particularly severe shift in coming months, when a record-setting sales surge is threatening to give way to the worst decline in a decade ...

Automotive

Volkswagen 'confident' despite global headwinds

German auto giant Volkswagen said Thursday that it was able to overcome global economic headwinds and supply chain issues to put in a "robust" performance in the first six months of 2022.

Automotive

Ukraine war slams brakes on European car sales

European car sales sank in March as Russia's invasion of Ukraine added more problems to a sector already struggling with shortages of semiconductors, industry data showed Wednesday.

Business

Google touts stalled reconciliation package in energy agenda

Google and other companies will fail to meet ambitious climate targets unless legislation and regulations are quickly approved and imposed to ramp up demand for cleaner forms of energy, the tech giant said in a new policy ...

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World economy

The world economy can be evaluated in various ways, depending on the model used, and this valuation can then be represented in various ways (for example, in 2006 US dollars). It is inseparable from the geography and ecology of Earth, and is therefore somewhat of a misnomer, since, while definitions and representations of the "world economy" vary widely, they must at a minimum exclude any consideration of resources or value based outside of the Earth. For example, while attempts could be made to calculate the value of currently unexploited mining opportunities in unclaimed territory in Antarctica, the same opportunities on Mars would not be considered a part of the world economy – even if currently exploited in some way – and could be considered of latent value only in the same way as uncreated intellectual property, such as a previously unconceived invention.

Beyond the minimum standard of concerning value in production, use, and exchange on the planet Earth, definitions, representations, models, and valuations of the world economy vary widely.

It is common to limit questions of the world economy exclusively to human economic activity, and the world economy is typically judged in monetary terms, even in cases in which there is no efficient market to help valuate certain goods or services, or in cases in which a lack of independent research or government cooperation makes establishing figures difficult. Typical examples are illegal drugs and other black market goods, which by any standard are a part of the world economy, but for which there is by definition no legal market of any kind.

However, even in cases in which there is a clear and efficient market to establish a monetary value, economists do not typically use the current or official exchange rate to translate the monetary units of this market into a single unit for the world economy, since exchange rates typically do not closely reflect worldwide value, for example in cases where the volume or price of transactions is closely regulated by the government. Rather, market valuations in a local currency are typically translated to a single monetary unit using the idea of purchasing power. This is the method used below, which is used for estimating worldwide economic activity in terms of real US dollars. However, the world economy can be evaluated and expressed in many more ways. It is unclear, for example, how many of the world's 6.6 billion people have most of their economic activity reflected in these valuations.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA