Machine learning & AI

How well can computers connect symptoms to diseases?

A new MIT study finds "health knowledge graphs," which show relationships between symptoms and diseases and are intended to help with clinical diagnosis, can fall short for certain conditions and patient populations. The ...

Consumer & Gadgets

3-D printing chocolate: Bespoke confectionery gets an innovation

Based in the Pennovation Center, Cocoa Press is the fledgling 3D printing operation of Evan Weinstein, a May 2019 graduate and a graduate student in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. As a high school student ...

Robotics

Pushy robots learn the fundamentals of object manipulation

MIT researchers have compiled a dataset that captures the detailed behavior of a robotic system physically pushing hundreds of different objects. Using the dataset—the largest and most diverse of its kind—researchers ...

Telecom

Better video streaming when WiFi is scarce

In an era when the average U.S. household has five internet-connected devices, web surfers may often feel like they're always fighting over scraps of WiFi. How can a whole family all binge their favorite shows without somebody's ...

Engineering

Wearable sensors detect what's in your sweat

Needle pricks not your thing? A team of scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, is developing wearable skin sensors that can detect what's in your sweat.

Wearable motion sensors could save unborn babies

The thump, thump of a baby's heartbeat is a milestone in any pregnancy. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a technique that could allow expectant parents to hear their baby's heartbeat continuously ...

Engineering

Barn owls may hold key to navigation and location

The way barn owl brains use sound to locate prey may be a template for electronic directional navigation devices, according to a team of Penn State engineers who are recreating owl brain circuitry in electronics.

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