Robotics

Biologically-inspired skin improves robots' sensory abilities

Sensitive synthetic skin enables robots to sense their own bodies and surroundings—a crucial capability if they are to be in close contact with people. Inspired by human skin, a team at the Technical University of Munich ...

Computer Sciences

Building computers the way our brains work

We are approaching the limit for how much more microprocessors can be developed. Gunnar Tufte proposes building computers in a completely new way, inspired by the human brain and nanotechnology.

Engineering

A new era in 3-D printing

In the mid-15th century, a new technology that would change the course of history was invented. Johannes Gutenberg's printing press, with its movable type, promoted the dissemination of information and ideas that is widely ...

Engineering

Rapid magnetic 3-D printing of human cells

Imagine being able to visit your physician, and instead of being given a one-size-fits-all treatment, you are given a specifically customized medication for your symptoms.

Robotics

Researchers create nano-bot to probe inside human cells

University of Toronto Engineering researchers have built a set of magnetic 'tweezers' that can position a nano-scale bead inside a human cell in three dimensions with unprecedented precision. The nano-bot has already been ...

Computer Sciences

A new strategy to correct imperfections in occupancy grid maps

Researchers at Laboratório de Computação de Alto Desempenho (LCAD) of Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), in Brazil, have devised a novel strategy for correcting imperfections in occupancy grid maps by correcting ...

Engineering

Engineers create miniature self-sealing 'wound'

Biomedical engineers have developed a miniature self-sealing model system for studying bleeding and the clotting of wounds. The researchers envision the device as a drug discovery platform and potential diagnostic tool.

Engineering

Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties

The human heart beats more than 2.5 billion times in an average lifetime. Now scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart's amazing biomechanical properties.

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