Business

UN agency: Innovation continued even as coronavirus emerged

The U.N.'s intellectual property agency said Monday that innovation marched forward last year despite the impact of the coronavirus outbreak. Technology, pharmaceuticals and biotech industries boosted their investments, even ...

Engineering

Study: 'Fingerprint' for 3D printer accurate 92% of time

3D printing is transforming everything from fashion and health care to transportation and toys. But this rapidly evolving technology, also known as additive manufacturing, can threaten national security and intellectual property ...

Business

Spain declares delivery riders to be staff, in EU first

Spain's government announced Thursday a deal that will recognise riders working for delivery firms such as Deliveroo and UberEats as salaried staff following complaints about their working conditions—a first in the EU.

Business

US blacklists Chinese companies including chip giant SMIC

The United States on Friday announced it has imposed export controls on 77 Chinese companies including the country's biggest chipmaker, SMIC, restricting its access to US technology over its alleged ties to China's military.

Business

SoftBank Group selling Arm to NVIDIA for up to $40 billion

Japan's SoftBank Group said Monday it is selling British chip designer Arm to US firm NVIDIA for up to $40 billion, potentially creating a new giant in the industry but sparking an investigation by UK regulators and fears ...

page 1 from 4

Intellectual property

Intellectual property (IP) is a number of disparate types of legal monopolies over creations of the mind, both artistic and commercial, and the corresponding fields of law. Under intellectual property law, owners are granted certain exclusive rights to a variety of intangible assets, such as musical, literary, and artistic works; ideas, discoveries and inventions; and words, phrases, symbols, and designs. Common types of intellectual property include copyrights, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights and trade secrets in some jurisdictions.

The majority[which?] of intellectual property rights provide creators of original works a form of temporary monopoly with the aim of creating an economic incentive to develop and share ideas.

Although many of the legal principles governing intellectual property have evolved over centuries, it was not until the 19th century that the term intellectual property began to be used, and, it is said, not until the late 20th century that it became commonplace in the United States.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA